0

Urban Desires by Michele Sanandajian-detail

When it comes to holding the viewer's attention, texture can take a quilt from good to great. As quilters we are taught that the more variety, when it comes to fabric selection, the more interesting a piece can be. But don't just let the fabric do all of the work, include other forms of interest in your work to make a much bigger impact. Take the example of Urban Desires by Michele Sanandajian. As your eye moves around the piece, notice how all of the different elements, smooth (leather), shiny (metal ring), rough (threadwork), soft (yarn bits) and lumpy (textured leather), work to tell a story while at the same time playing well together as a whole.
 
Imagining India by Pat Holly
Pat Holly's Imagining India is another example of creating real visual interest with her masterful use of silk fabric, decorative ribbon trim, machine applique, and decorative background stitches.
 
Imagining India by Pat Holly Detail
 

                                                                    (Images, Jane Sassaman blog)

This week, Mary Elizabeth Kinch (Show 1502) shares how, with even small pieces of fabric, one can create maximum visual interest and movement in quilts.

Texture
by Mary Elizabeth Kinch

Texture is the physical quality of a surface or a substance that we experience through our sense of touch. A strong element of design, texture adds depth and visual variety. It draws the viewer in, engaging them with the work and creating an emotional response.  Everything has texture!  

There are two types of texture in design: tactile and visual or implied.

Tactile Texture is the actual real physical quality of the surface that can be felt and appreciated, like the smoothness of satin or the roughness of sandpaper.  Tactile texture is created with materials, processes and techniques, and how these are used together. 

John Singer Sargent, 1894-1895, Ada Rehan.  Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession Number: 40.146

Visual or Implied Textureis a realistic illusion that is representative of, or imitates, texture. It is the perception of texture and is as powerful sensorily as tactile texture.  Even though we cannot touch it, we experience a mental response as if we could feel what we see. Sargent expertly creates visual texture through the use of value, clearly depicting not only the luscious folds of the gown but the smoothness and weight of the silk satin used in the dress.

Creating visual textureand a sense of depth and contour, is achieved through a combination of different elements such as value, line and the principle of repetition.

Ian Kinch, Bow Bridge, Central Park, 2016  https://www.instagram.com/i.w.kinch/

 

This photo is a great example of perceived visual texture through the use of value, line and repetition. The rhythmic texture of the railings on the bridge is created through repetition and line. Value (and a bit of repetition) creates the soft texture of the leaves.  And line and value do the work of creating spiky texture of the pine needles in the upper foreground.

 

 

 

 

 

(Ian Kinch, Bow Bridge, Central Park, 2016  https://www.instagram.com/i.w.kinch/)

Jules-Edmond-Charles Lachaise and Eugnene-Pierre Gourdet, Design for a ceiling with trompe l’oeil balustrade, second half 19th century.  Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession Number 67.827.499

Trompe L’oeil, a form of visual texture, is a design technique that is all about tricking our eye into seeing a 2D object as 3D. Here Mr. Lachaise and Mr. Gourdet have created a lovely example of trompe l’oeil.  My eye is definitely tricked!

Quilts are naturally tactile through the use of various materials and techniques such as the quilting stitch, trapunto, decorative stitches or embellishments. Quilts made with many small pieces, are immensely tactile because of the sheer number of tiny morsels of fabric and the seams that join them.

 

 

 

 

Mary Elizabeth Kinch, Leap of Faith, 2007

 

In quilts visual texture is created using the same concepts of value, line and repetition. Leap of Faith employs all three to generate visual texture.

Thoughtful value placement and careful positioning of color create the trompe l’oeil effect, in the centre of the quilt creating the impression of a 3D form.  The contrast of light and dark, the dark points of the HSTs facing towards the centre, and the four darker inner rounds create dynamic visual texture and the illusion of depth. The next “frame” of dark squares on point on a medium background anchor the sense of movement and depth of the inner composition. Further out, the combination of values used in the round of “Broken Dishes” and two rows of HSTs contrast with the values used in the rest of the quilt, creating another “frame” and reinforcing the illusion of depth in the centre of the quilt.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is the quilt in black and white.  Removing the element of colour sometimes the effect of value is more obvious. More texture is created with the lines in the block construction and by repeating the same block in each round. The outer rounds of “Flying Geese” purposefully having the geese “flying” in opposite directions adds some positive tension to the texture through movement.  

This quilt’s small scale piecing created an opportunity for generous combinations of printed fabric designs to create visual texture. Printed fabrics offer great diversity when we think of them not just for their colour but also look at them in terms of scale of the print, style of the printed pattern and the density of the print.

Mary Elizabeth Kinch, Leap of Faith, 2007

This quilt’s small scale piecing created an opportunity for generous combinations of printed fabric designs to create visual texture. Printed fabrics offer great diversity when we think of them not just for their colour but also look at them in terms of scale of the print, style of the printed pattern and the density of the print.

Mary Elizabeth Kinch, Leap of Faith, 2007 Detail

 

In this close-up you can see how a variety of prints helps create visual texture.  Consider print characteristics like large and small scale florals, stripes (both straight lined and patterned), dots, plaids, bold graphic motifs and subtle low volume prints.  The possibilities are endless!

Using line, value and repetition together you too can create exciting visual texture in your quilts.

 

 

 
 
 
 
Practice Exercise: Finding Texture in a Quilt

Easy exercise 1:
Find how many ways texture has been used in this charming small TQS Classroom Project quilt by Lauren Vlcek (Show 1206). 
Hint, not all of the fabrics are cotton. 

 

Click here for more topics related to the Design to Quilt program.

  0

This is a great 3-D block. Just imagine the possibilities depending on the color values you use.  

  1

The amazing QuiltCon 2017 Best in Show quilt came all the way from Tasmania. The large paper-pieced quilt is truly a "gem." Click on See the Quilts to see more winners.

 

Click here to watch a quick interview with Katherine Jones, the creator of the Best in Show quilt, bling. See her quilt below.

 

bling
Pieced and quilted by Katherine Jones
Chigwell, Tasmania, Australia
Tasmanian Modern Quilt Guild
@twocatsquilts
98 x 98 inches
Piecing

"Foundation paper pieced from solid fabrics the inspiration for this quilt was a princess cut diamond."

(QuiltCon 2017)

  0
Ricky talks to Alaskan quilter  Maria Shell  about vintage fabric, making quilts, and why she calls herself a "bitmaker."
 

  1

Jane Sassaman not only designs amazing quilts, she even posted a yummy recipe for Irish Soda Bread (it's really her friend Susan's recipe) on her blog.
 
 
To keep everything warm, they also included directions for making bread warmers.
 
 
Want to see Jane at work? Watch Show 301 where she demonstrates how to create a stunning quilt using large, bold prints with a simple silhouette pattern.
 
 
 

  1
Joan Ford of Hummingbird Highway has created a fun table runner saluting the Irish. This is a great project for scraps and features "hidden" nine-patch blocks. Make one and St. Patrick will be smiling.
 
 

(photo: WeAllSew)

  2

The charm of simple Churn Dash blocks surrounded by stupendous quilting, takes this quilt from traditional to terrific.

Star Members can watch Amy in Show 2004: Into the Woods We Go - Embroidery with Whimsy in Stitches.

SimplyDashingbyAmyMcClellan - 36 Pieces Non-Rotating

SimplyDashingbyAmyMcClellan - 100 Pieces Non-Rotating

SimplyDashingbyAmyMcClellan - 289 Pieces Non-Rotating

SimplyDashingbyAmyMcClellan - 36 Pieces Rotating

SimplyDashingbyAmyMcClellan - 100 Pieces Rotating

SimplyDashingbyAmyMcClellan - 289 Pieces Rotating

Original Photo: Mary Kay Davis

  0

The charm of simple Churn Dash blocks surrounded by stupendous quilting, takes this quilt from traditional to terrific.

Star Members can watch Amy in Show 2004: Into the Woods We Go - Embroidery with Whimsy in Stitches.

Original Photo: Mary Kay Davis

  2

 
TQS wants you to be a part of the 2017 Quilters' Survey. Your voice, opinions, and quilting practices and preferences, will be quantified with the results and seen by industry leaders. And you’ll have a chance to win some great prizes as well!
 

The survey itself may take up to twenty minutes to complete, and closes on Thursday, March 9. You will be able to enter the prize drawing after completion. Winners will be announced by March 16.

Click here to take the survey.

 

 

  8
Watch a fabulous group of friends celebrate at the Carnival of Puerto Serrano. Does your sewing machine dance?
 

Have you seen the latest, greatest EverSewn Sparrow20 for $279.99?

Check out all the EverSewn Sewing Machine Models here!

 

 

Take your EverSewn Sewing Machine to class with you, as these are only 16lbs!

 

Show #1912 - Rosa Rojas 

Apliquick Rods

 

 

Apliquick - 3 Holes Microserrated Scissors

 

 

 Apliquick Egonomic Tweezers 

Watch Bernina Videos

Bernina

Innova