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Hugs and Kisses - Month 10 - 10

Available On:
October 01, 2010

Instructions no longer available

"The Whig Rose Wreath" The Whig Rose was an applique pattern first seen in the 1830s. It is believed to be named in support of the Whig political party, which was the predecessor of today's Republican Party. The block has dozens and dozens of variations, but nearly all of its variations in the 1800s involved the use of red and/or pink roses with green stems and leaves. It is sometimes called a Rose of Sharon or Democrat Rose or Antique Rose block. Many old Whig Rose quilts still exist today because they were regarded as the "best" quilts and were well-protected and preserved. The pattern's popularity has not diminished over time. Speaking of time... let's put it to good use and start this block!

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Hugs and Kisses - Month 11 - 11

Available On:
November 01, 2010

Instructions no longer available

"Crossed Roses" Many floral dictionaries were published in the early 1800s, defining the language of flowers. These Victorian reference books explicitly documented the meaning of flowers, and extended to a flower's type, color, condition, and form of presentation. Victorian ladies studied these books with great enthusiasm, believing that flowers were an important form of communication. A "tussie-mussie," a tiny bouquet of fragrant flowers, was often assembled and offered to a person in celebration of friendship or an event - or as a simple "thank you!" Tussie-mussies were frequently bestowed as tokens of love. If you were to put together a tussie-mussie, what would you want it to express to another person? Think about it - and while you do, let's start making this month's spray of crossed roses.

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Hugs and Kisses - Month 12 - 12

Available On:
December 01, 2010

Instructions no longer available

"Ring around the Roses" The childhood song, "Ring around the rosies, pocket full of posies; ashes, ashes, we all fall down!" is a fun singing game for young children. It first showed up in print in an 1881 Kate Greenaway edition of Mother Goose, although it was around earlier. Some people associate the song with the outbreak of the Bubonic plague, alleging that the words equate to the plague's rosy rash, sneezing, air-purifying posies, and the ashes of death. Scholars have discounted this theory, noting that the explanation does not match historical records. This month's "Ring Around the Roses" block is the final one in this block-of-the-month series. Once you finish it, you will work on the cornerstones, borders, and assembling the quilt. What a great journey this has been! Let's get started on the last leg of the trip.


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