Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Designing a quilt pattern

Designing a quilt pattern 11 Nov 2009 07:47 #40459

  • PosyP
  • PosyP's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 4106
  • Thank you received: 361
I stopped at the end point and left long threads, which I later went back and threaded them into a needle with which I then took a long stitch between the layers, pulled it taut and snipped off close to the fabric, this leaves the long ends inside the quilt. I have bought a packet of 'easy threading needles' ready for when I get to this stage of my next quilt, as all the threading up for one stitch gets tedious, but it holds just fine. You can pull the under side thread up and finish off both ends at once, or work from the back, play and see.

Rosemary


Embroideress Extrordinaire & Mad Hatter
Last Edit: by PosyP.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

11 Nov 2009 06:15 #40453

Shirley, if you're really careful you can backtrack in the ditch along the edge of the applique to the next crosshatching line.
Last Edit: by elsielf.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

10 Nov 2009 20:51 #40449

  • shirlm
  • shirlm's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 113
  • Thank you received: 1
Speaking of cross hatching, I would love your advice......say, for example, you are cross hatching a background around a leave and vine applique design. What is the best way to start and stop the stitching line as you work around the applique?

Do you lock the stitch, then jump over the applique and lock the beginning stitch again? And if so, what's the best way to "lock" the stitch and make it look nice. I've found the locking (machine tacking) or taking a couple of backstitches doesn't produce a neat look.

Or, do you bring the thread to the back of the quilt and tie off? This method can be very time consuming.

Hope this makes sense.....Shirley

Shreveport, Louisiana
Bernina 440QE
Last Edit: by shirlm.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

designing a quilt pattern 10 Nov 2009 14:30 #40444

  • PosyP
  • PosyP's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 4106
  • Thank you received: 361
If you want to put on a background of cross hatching, once you have the main elements of your design in place, draw a diagonal line from top right corner to bottom left ( or vice versa) stopping and starting where the design elements are, so you don't draw over them, then continue with parallel lines working out wards. Do this in both directions and you should have your cross hatching centered to the middle of your quilt but going 'behind' your design elements.

hope this makes sense.

Rosemary


Embroideress Extrordinaire & Mad Hatter
Last Edit: by PosyP.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

27 Oct 2009 18:24 #40126

  • PDQuilt
  • PDQuilt's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 514
  • Thank you received: 2
To center the markings, just fold the paper in half. Surely this must have occurred to you?
Last Edit: by PDQuilt.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Designing a quilt pattern 27 Oct 2009 15:27 #40122

  • drj2athome
  • drj2athome's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 640
  • Thank you received: 3
On another thread in basic machine quilting I asked how do I make symmetrical designs and was told to do Ricky's technique of folding the paper and using a coin to transfer the pencil markings to the other half of the paper. I also wanted to add a background of cross hatching and I was not sure how to center the markings. What other tools for drafting quilting designs are there out there? I suppose equilt software might help. I am curious how much it costs. Jan
1Peter5:7
Last Edit: by drj2athome.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.194 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum