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TOPIC: Changing needles???

02 May 2008 12:05 #17687

Ok I just got done talking to my mother about my Gramma's sewing machine. She was laughing so hard. She said that everytime she or Gramma would sew on the thing they would always change the needle first. I guess that is why I never had to. I just wish they would have told me they were doing it. LOL It would explain quite a bit about the last ten years of the machines life with me after Gramma died. All I can say is I am very absent minded. If it aint broke leave it alone. Well I guess that theory needs adjusting in the sewing world. Rachel
Last Edit: by 911kitchen.
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changing needles and maintenance 02 May 2008 06:57 #17673

eileenkny wrote:
I didn't know we had to oil the computerized machines. From what I understood, they're to be oiled by the tech when the machine goes in for the annual maintenance.
eileenkny

You should check your own machine manual. Different machine brands have different ways to keep them in top condition. My Bernina should be oiled approximately every 6 hours of sewing but other models with different hook systems might be different.

Also check with your dealer for yearly maintenance. An authorized tech cleans, oils & adjusts parts that we can't (and aren't supposed to) see.

Needle changes are crucial for great stitching. Using the proper needle for the task is also critical. Ball points for knits, universal for general sewing and sharps for embroidery or quilting. Remember the recent show on TQS where the Thread Man talked about top stitch needles for machine quilting with heavier weight threads? I have had some fun playing with that as well.
Last Edit: by kmouse.
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01 May 2008 12:56 #17651

You are all probably all going to laugh and fall off you chairs but on my Grandmother's machine I have never changed the needle. I have had it for over 25 years. Mind you I have only been quilting for about 5 years with a 2 year absence in between year 2 and 3. However, I have made several dresses with it. I have though faithfully oiled it and cleaned it. Right now it is broken. (not the needle, the machine) On my other machine I have replaced the needle much more often. This however is not because I thought of it but because my children or someone else would touch my machine and my needle would be the one thing missing. Once it was my presser foot. That caused a huge reaction from me and it was returned within a few hours. I told you, you would probably laugh or fall off your chair. What can I say OOPS Rachel
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01 May 2008 09:09 #17641

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I put a drop of oil in every 2-3 bobbins also. The 440 Bernina I have now is almost 2 years old. They have an oil can light that comes on every 180, 000 stitches. I lost track after about 40 times, I was trying to keep a count.
Well, my machine was in for service last week and when the tech checked the counter I was up to 9 million stitches!!!
My Bernina is like a timex, keeps on ticking.

Cher in BC

Vancouver, BC Canada
Last Edit: by Cher4.
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01 May 2008 08:26 #17638

Judy...my dealer and class instructor said the same thing for my Bernina. After so many hours or stitches an 'oil light' is displayed on the screen....just like in my car when I have to take it for a change.

Depending on the project, I may change needs twice during the project. In my thoughts, for a good crisp stitch...minimal cost of a needle is cheap.

FW
Last Edit: by FabricWhisperer.
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01 May 2008 02:32 #17623

Eileen, in the class I took for my new Bernina, the teacher said to put a drop of oil in the bobbin area after every 2 or 3 bobbins. The dealer has to service the rest of the computerized machine. I can't remember off hand about needles, but I think I heard to change them after several hours of sewing or machine quilting.
Last Edit: by Judymc.
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oiling your machine 30 Apr 2008 09:24 #17588

Eileen, I think it depends on your manufacturer whether you oil or not. My new Viking Sapphire is no oil and specifically states in the instructions not to use any of the compressed air products to clean it (like used on a computer keyboard -lets see when did I do that last -like never!!! LOL) So my thought is read your manual and if it says oil then oil on that schedule and if it says don't oil DON'T!!!!

I figure we spent a whole lot more on the motorhome and if it pays to follow its maintenance schedule, then it pays to do the same on my machines. Now my problem is finding a Viking dealer that does cleaning and maintenance anymore near where I am going to be. The one in MPLS/ST.PAUL is so unreliable I wouldn't trust him with anything any more. I am not sure he knows what he is doing since he put my needle threader on, didn't tighten the screw so it fell off before we got home and then wouldn't return my calls. Too bad too because his mom owns the business and she has all the Viking dealerships in the area. Don't know what will happen to the business if ds gets to take over. Well guess I will have to give him a second chance this summer if I can't find someone sooner. Anybody know someone near Elgin Illinois that works on Vikings please let me know.

Well that is enough of that rant and rave for today Thanks for listening anyway.

Ann hopefullly on the way to Illinois next week
Last Edit: by snowplow3840.
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30 Apr 2008 06:35 #17584

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I think I better go change my needle. :oops:
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30 Apr 2008 05:16 #17578

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I didn't know we had to oil the computerized machines. From what I understood, they're to be oiled by the tech when the machine goes in for the annual maintenance.
eileenkny

from the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY
Gammill Classic Plus w/IQ
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When to change needles 29 Apr 2008 23:19 #17576

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Change needles after four bobbins and oil your machine after 12 bobbins.
Last Edit: by quilting00.
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29 Apr 2008 20:54 #17570

I've always heard 8 hours, but how I'd ever figure or remember that is beyond me! If I've had a marathon-sew-in or managed to sew every evening for a week or 2, I'll usually think to change it. And now, I write the date of the new one on blue painter's tape & stick it on the machine!! :o
Or sometimes if a different size is called for, I'll toss the current one just b/c I'd never be able to remember how long it'd been used if at all. Speaking of tossing tho', I did pick up a good hint, and had DH drill a hole in the top of a pill bottle for needle & pin disposal. When it's getting full, just trade it for a regular top to throw away, then put the drilled top on a new bottle. REALLY helps on trash day!
Florence
Last Edit: by florence.
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29 Apr 2008 11:35 #17549

Before I joined TQS, I replaced a needle once in 10 years!! I thought you were supposed to change it when it broke!! :lol:
Last Edit: by DamarisEstrada.
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29 Apr 2008 11:15 #17548

the first day of the week that I sit down to sew...I change the needle, brush out the dust and oil my baby. maybe over-lovin', but it doesn't give me any back talk.
Last Edit: by lwiniger.
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29 Apr 2008 11:13 #17547

My needles seem to get dull after 2 -3 quilts, I don't change my needles that often though. I can tell by the way the needle hits down into the fabric when it's time to change my needles, "by the sound and looks of the needle holes going into the fabric". I have been known to change my needle in the middle of the quilt due to the dullness. I keep a good supply of needles at hand and I also buy lots of extra bobbins for each machine. I would need a bigger supply of needles if I changed with every quilt. My stitches seem to stay nice and even through out. I know back in the day I would only change needles if they broke, sewing many months at a time! LOL!
Last Edit: by KathySamson.
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