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Introducing the 2013 TQS Block of the Month designed by Sue Nickels and Pat Holly! It's called "TWO OF US" and was created by the two of them. The quilt measures 79" x 79" and was completed just in time for Houston.

TOPIC: Appliqué fabric lifting

Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 30 Jun 2013 13:24 #105957

Ditch it, Lorchen! Head to Lakeland and buy a tub of their powdered starch and then mix as required in a spray bottle. Remember to wash it out afterwards as even in our temperate climate, those pesky silverfish will search it out and they will also eat the fabric as well as the starch.
A very experienced quilter came to demonstrate the uses of an iron to our group of youngsters yesterday and showed the difference that a squirt of starch can make. The liquid is better as an aerosol contains lots of other chemicals and who knows what damage it does to fabric, let alone our lungs? Anyway, she uses starch all the time, both before cutting out and whilst stitching and her points were fantastic!
As for uses of an iron - pressing and setting seams, applique, transfer of dye from printed paper bags to manmade fabric, transfer of pigment from flowers and leaves to cotton ( both the latter 2 are hit and miss dependant on paper and plant!)

Fiona.
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 27 Jun 2013 14:21 #105805

  • Lorchen
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Hitting forehead with flat hand........ and grinning!

Margo, my lack of experience shows. I thought you starch the applique pieces. I never thought of the background fabric. I actually have a whole can of spray starch. I don't even know if it's still useable. It must be 4 or 5 years old. Maybe I should get it out and use it. :)
From the edge of Sherwood Forest, home of Robin Hood
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 27 Jun 2013 12:29 #105796

  • Margo
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Glad you got it figured out Jeannine! And no...Ricky's Stable Stuff is NOT a fusible product.


It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter
That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived !
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 27 Jun 2013 11:19 #105782

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P.s. I meant FLORIANI Stitch n Fuse! Auto correct on the iPad...I also wanted to report that I purchased Sue and Pat's book on appliqué, what an awesome book, very useful addition to anyone's quilting library as it is full of very detailed how to info, 5 stars really!
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 27 Jun 2013 11:13 #105780

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Thanks for the post Margo. I wanted to report that I received my new Softfuse from Sue Nickels website and it is working much better. Works like a charm. I think the stuff I used in the beginning may have been old and on the roll in the quilt shop for some time. That is something I never thought about initially, even though I had purchased it recently, I think they had it too long in the shop. Luckily for me, I had ordered some sheet from Sue prior to finding this in my stash. When I started using the new batch, no problems.....goes to show that sometimes it is not the product but the age of the item. I'm sure the glue deteriorated with room moisture as well, so I always store fusibles in a ziploc bag. I have some. Florian Stich n Fuse and wonder if it is the same product as the Ricky Stable Stuff as I know there are only a few companies making these products.
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 27 Jun 2013 06:26 #105759

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Lorchen wrote:
I can't get Soft Fuse in the UK, but always use the lower end of 'cotton' on my iron (and never with steam). Seems to work for me.

Not being the perfectionist that Margo is and so producing much less detailed and 'wow'-inspiring work, I never use starch. I must admit I'm the 'touch-feely' type and love to handle soft fabric.

Hey Lorchen! Trust me...I am NOT a perfectionist, and I am also a touchy feely type!! But...I do love the ease of stitching applique onto a heavily starched background, and I can tell you that I never need to re-glue any elements. Even these long borders with lots of folding and turning the background fabric, nothing has ever shifted out of place, because I am generous with both starch and glue. Remember though, I am turning my edges over Ricky Tims's Stable Stuff, using lots of Elmer's washable glue sticks. I do not like using fusible web, and I personally do not like the flat look of fused applique.

After my binding is on, the entire quilt will be soaked and laundered (more than once if necessary) to remove all the stiffness and my project will be cuddly soft from then on.

I know that the Month 7 directions tell us specifically that Sue and Pat do not have trouble with their pieces lifting because of the starch, and they are the prize winning quilters, but if you are having trouble with their technique, maybe you need to try something different?

Some important notes from
Sue and Pat on stitched
raw-edge appliqué for borders:
– – – – We use SoftFuse brand paper-backed
fusible web. If you have chosen to use a different
brand of fusible web, please follow the
manufacturer’s directions for the iron setting
and fusing time.
– – – – We starch the background fabric with
spray starch to give it the necessary stability for
the machine stitching. We have never found
this prevents the fused patches from adhering
to the background fabric.
– – – – When stitching the long borders and
rolling (or scrolling) the border in order to easily
turn it at the machine, some of the fused appliqué
patches may pull away from the background
slightly. Before machine stitching these,
press them again to fuse to the background.
Then stitch.
– – – – The purpose of the fusible web is to prevent
fraying along the raw edges and to hold the
patches to the background fabric long enough
for them to be stitched in place. The stitching is
what ultimately secures the appliqué patches to
the background fabric.
– – – – There are many different methods of
machine appliqué. Please note that our instructions
are for the stitched raw-edge machine
appliqué technique that we developed and
have used for many years. There is no fraying
on the patch edges, and we have washed our
quilts—carefully, of course. We use a single
blanket stitch with recommended settings,
SoftFuse paperbacked fusible web, and an average
weight cotton thread. We stitch every raw
edge. We can’t guarantee your results if you are
using methods and products other than those
we have recommended. If you are interested in
more details on this method, our book Stitched
Raw Edge Appliqué is available from AQS and
from http://www.sue-nickels.com.


It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter
That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived !
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 27 Jun 2013 01:59 #105746

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I can't get Soft Fuse in the UK, but always use the lower end of 'cotton' on my iron (and never with steam). Seems to work for me.

Not being the perfectionist that Margo is and so producing much less detailed and 'wow'-inspiring work, I never use starch. I must admit I'm the 'touch-feely' type and love to handle soft fabric.
From the edge of Sherwood Forest, home of Robin Hood
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 18 Apr 2013 13:18 #101882

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The Shades Softfuse is very light, so maybe I did not have the heat high enough. I did go to their website beforehand and it said to use a medium heat, so will give it a cotton setting and see what happens. Thanks for all the feedback.
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 18 Apr 2013 06:55 #101823

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Rita's advice is right on the money! Be sure to follow your manufacturer's instructions. My fabrics are heavily starched also, and I'm not having any problem.

The glue stick sounds like a good quick fix.


It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter
That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived !
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 18 Apr 2013 05:40 #101820

Hi ssgirl. I don't think the starch is the problem because I have heavily starched my fabrics without any problems. I know that all the different fusibles have differing amounts of time that they take to fuse. These can be quite critical - particularly with Bondaweb wonder under for example. I personally hate it but it is all I can get here at the moment. I am wondering if you are ironing too much which will burn away the fusible and thus cause it to lift? What I have done is ironed everything down according to the manufacturers instructions and then I don't iron it again until I have finished blanket stitching down everything on the piece. If you google the manufacturer of whatever fusible you have you will be able to find the exact instruction for it. Hope that helps.

Betty's suggestion of using a glue stick is a good one. Thanks Betty. :D
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Re: Appliqué fabric lifting 18 Apr 2013 05:37 #101819

  • BettyD
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I have had that issue before, too. I ended up using glue stick to hold the applique pieces in place for stitching. All turned out well and now I know not to use starch when planning to use fusible. Betty D
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Appliqué fabric lifting 17 Apr 2013 20:42 #101788

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Is anyone else having issues with their appliqués lifting? I think it is the amount of starch suggested prior to fusing. I'm pressing between stitching the various pieces, but it is a bit annoying. I did wonder about the instructions as most of the fusibles say not to starch the fabric.
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