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TOPIC: Straightening fabric?

Re: Straightening fabric? 17 Mar 2011 20:53 #60368

  • kathyst2
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cblong03 wrote:
I swear by Harriet Hargrave's method of straightening; I've used it ever since I took her Precision Piecing class. I starch it, until it can walk away on its own. Make's it so much easier to quilt it, later on. Good luck and happy straightening!

Hi Beth, I'm glad to get some info from someone who has actually taken her class. I see from your profile that you are indeed a precision piecer. I may try this on a bigger scale and see if I have better results in my accuracy. It was a little surprising to me to see how far off grain that one piece that I did straighten her way was. Thanks for posting!
Kathy
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Re: Straightening fabric? 17 Mar 2011 20:40 #60367

  • Margo
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cblong03 wrote:
I swear by Harriet Hargrave's method of straightening; I've used it ever since I took her Precision Piecing class. I starch it, until it can walk away on its own. Make's it so much easier to quilt it, later on. Good luck and happy straightening!

Does Harriet recommend straightening the grain lines, or just starching it so much that it doesn't matter?

I'm a huge fan of starch myself, and haven't straightened fabric in 30 years UNLESS it was a stripe that I wanted to be sewn in a straight line! :D


It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter
That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived !
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Re: Straightening fabric? 17 Mar 2011 20:32 #60366

I swear by Harriet Hargrave's method of straightening; I've used it ever since I took her Precision Piecing class. I starch it, until it can walk away on its own. Make's it so much easier to quilt it, later on. Good luck and happy straightening!
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Re: Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 16:30 #59305

  • pam7040
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Been there, done that!! And Mother was a real stickler for matching the lines of stripes and plaids, but would never dream of using them together! :lol:
Margo, I must have gone to the same teacher as your mother. :lol: :lol: I was taught that the matching of stripesand plaids is a sign of a good quality garment. :D :D


In leafy Berkshire, south of England.
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Re: Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 13:33 #59302

  • ritzy
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The first time I took my daughter to a fabric store so she could pick out prom dress material, the lady did the ripping thing and I thought my daughter would have a stroke when she heard the fabric torn. It was quite funny.
Blessing from Northwest Indiana, USA
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Re: Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 12:53 #59298

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I clip the selvage, pull on a thread until it breaks, cut on the line, then continue pulling a thread until I'm across the width of fabric. I haven't done this in a long time. Drapery fabrics were easier to do because of the heavier threads.
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Re: Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 11:44 #59290

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ajclapp wrote:
Stretching from corner to corner is how I did it too for my many years of clothing and drapery making. I usually pulled a thread instead of tearing though. But for all of these tiny pieces I cut out for quilts I'm not so concerned that the grain of the fabric is perfectly straight in both directions as long as my pieces are square. I do still stretch my woven plaids though to keep them straight but just cut on the lines on my printed plaids and stripes.

Annis,
How do you pull a thread out? I've tried back in my garment sewing days but never could do that.

The one piece of fabric I straightened with the Harriet Hargrave method, I was surprised at how off grain it was, and how well it came back into straightness (is that a word?). The pattern is a shirting with bitsy directional motifs so it's coming out nice in the blocks. I just never know with these bits of advice from books that are so different from what I'm used to doing, if they are a good idea that no one does, or if there's a reason no one does them.

Well, it's only fabric, right? I have 600 yards of it in my stash, give or take, so a little experimenting won't take it down much :)

Kathy
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Re: Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 11:38 #59289

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Stretching from corner to corner is how I did it too for my many years of clothing and drapery making. I usually pulled a thread instead of tearing though. But for all of these tiny pieces I cut out for quilts I'm not so concerned that the grain of the fabric is perfectly straight in both directions as long as my pieces are square. I do still stretch my woven plaids though to keep them straight but just cut on the lines on my printed plaids and stripes.
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Re: Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 07:06 #59266

  • Margo
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pam7040 wrote:
I remember more years ago than I care to remember, when I did alot of dressmaking it was very important to have the fabrics straightened. My mum and I would stand with each of us holding 2 diagonally opposite corners and gently tugging the fabric first one way diagonally and then the other. Eventually it would come straight and the garment would hang perfectly when finished. I hope that makes sense. If not I am sure someone else can explain it more clearly.

Me, too, Pam! Been there, done that!! And Mother was a real stickler for matching the lines of stripes and plaids, but would never dream of using them together! :lol:
She made slip covers for interior decorators, so she walked the walk, and every cover she ever made was matched up and the lines were perfectly straight! We pulled a lot of yardage!! :roll:


It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter
That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived !
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Re: Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 06:15 #59261

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I remember more years ago than I care to remember, when I did alot of dressmaking it was very important to have the fabrics straightened. My mum and I would stand with each of us holding 2 diagonally opposite corners and gently tugging the fabric first one way diagonally and then the other. Eventually it would come straight and the garment would hang perfectly when finished. I hope that makes sense. If not I am sure someone else can explain it more clearly.


In leafy Berkshire, south of England.
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Straightening fabric? 01 Mar 2011 00:14 #59256

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Hi, I just watched Sharon Pederson's classroom video on straightening fabrics, and that's the way I've been doing it. However, I have one of Harriet Hargraves books "quilter's academy" where she advocates tearing the fabric, and lining up the selvages, then persuading the fabric to go back on grain through pressing and spray starch by matching the torn edges. I've never heard of this one before. I did try it on a piece of fabric that came from the quilt shop off quite off grain, and it did work. Has anyone ever heard of this method, or used it? Seems like a waste of fabric to tear off strips from either end, but if it works, then it might make my piecing better. I made loads of HST's and flying geese past few days and the pattern on the fabric isn't all wonky like it usually is, and the flying geese don't ripple.

Kathy
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