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TOPIC: Ever washed a whole BOLT of fabric before?

Washing a whole bolt of fabric 28 Mar 2010 13:59 #44443

  • MEMA1
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I have heard that it is not a good idea (unless you have an industrial size washing machine) to wash more than 6 yards of fabric at one time. I think it has to do with the fabric being able to move in the machine so that all parts get wet, are cleaned, etc. I wonder since you are just trying to remove the chemicals if it would work just fine, but I guess you would have to experiment and that could lead to disaster (or at least a mess). Let us all know what you decide and how it came out, will you? Thanks!
Quiltingly yours,
From the beautiful
Canyon Country of

South-east Utah!
myraung@yahoo.com
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23 Sep 2009 08:22 #38645

  • QuilterLynn
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I was visiting my daughter last week and washed sheet in her top-loading washing machine. My God, were they twisted!

I now have a front loading washing machine and it doesn't twist much at all. That's another PLUS for a quilter!

But I'm not forgetting that safety pin washing machine tip for large quantities of yardage!

Good One!!

Lynn
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23 Sep 2009 07:05 #38633

  • Bluesbroad
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terrina wrote:
It was a tip from a speaker at a guild meeting. She started by asking, "have you ever seen an elephant's umbilicus?" This of course caught the attention of everyone in the room!

What was the next line? Don't leave us hanging here!
Brita

The Beautiful Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee USA
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23 Sep 2009 01:12 #38628

  • terrina
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It was a tip from a speaker at a guild meeting. She started by asking, "have you ever seen an elephant's umbilicus?" This of course caught the attention of everyone in the room!
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22 Sep 2009 13:30 #38613

  • ladyquilter
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terrina wrote:
Just had to add my 2 cents. I recently washed 7 yards at once for a backing. Before putting the fabric in the washer and dryer, I opened the fabric and folded the fabric back on itself until I had an accordian - type configuration. I then put large safety pins along one selvaged edge. I washed the whole "package" and dried with the pins in the material. I have been doing this for years and never a rust stain from the pins or a rip in my fabric. I learned this technique at a guild meeting years ago.

Great idea! Thanks for sharing.

JoJo

aka ladyquilter

Troutdale, OR
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22 Sep 2009 08:51 #38602

  • bar7700
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terrina..... What an interesting thing you do! I am definitely going to try this. I am on a wait list for a Blue Dear Jane BOM. I'm not sure if I supply my own background fabric. If I do I am going to try your method. Thanks!
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22 Sep 2009 01:58 #38597

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Just had to add my 2 cents. I recently washed 7 yards at once for a backing. Before putting the fabric in the washer and dryer, I opened the fabric and folded the fabric back on itself until I had an accordian - type configuration. I then put large safety pins along one selvaged edge. I washed the whole "package" and dried with the pins in the material. I have been doing this for years and never a rust stain from the pins or a rip in my fabric. I learned this technique at a guild meeting years ago.
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21 Sep 2009 15:30 #38588

  • ladyquilter
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Thanks everyone! You're all the best.

JoJo

aka ladyquilter

Troutdale, OR
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21 Sep 2009 12:22 #38581

  • eileenkny
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JoJo,
I'd wash it 2 yards at a time. That will give you plenty to work with for the time being.
Eileen

from the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY
Gammill Classic Plus w/IQ
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20 Sep 2009 20:48 #38562

  • Mailmanldy
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I would just leave it on the bolt, and cut off as much as you need, when you need it, and wash that.
However, if you decide to wash it all at once, using Mary Ellens Best Press is great to get out wrinkles. I use it all the time on my yardage, and it works wonders.

Diane in Colorado Springs
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20 Sep 2009 20:09 #38560

  • WandaM
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JoJo, I have found that I'm more happy if I use more managable size pieces. I'm guessing that this is the reason for the fat quarter craze!!
I had a 3 yard piece that I washed last week. First I cut it in half, but when it came to untangling (is that a word!) the fabric, I wished that I had cut it in one yard pieces.
Of course this would not work well for backings!
Good luck with the Dear Jane!
Wanda
Happy Quilting,

Shiner TX
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19 Sep 2009 09:27 #38522

  • bar7700
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Jo Jo..... You will save your sanity if you divide the bolt of fabric up before you wash and dry it. Otherwise the fabric will get twisted (like sheets do) and you will have creases that were not there before! Very hard to get out.

I just did 50 yards of fabric. They were different amounts. 1 yd, 2 yd and 3 yd pieces. I did learn a lesson. Take the fabric out while still damp. Some I did this with and some I didn't. The fabric I dried all the way was a mess and very hard to iron smooth. I didn't iron it all at once. I just smoothed it out as it came out of the dryer and hung it over the roller bars on my longarm. Some of it that I got smoothed out while damp only needed the selvage ironed. :-)

Go ahead and rip up that bolt and do it all at once and get it out of the way. You will thank yourself later.

Barbara
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19 Sep 2009 03:23 #38514

Whatever you decide to do (I like the bit at a time option!) don't forget to unfold the central crease before you wash it or you will have a faded line for always down the centre. :roll: :D
Amo

Ye olde Dorsetshire
England

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18 Sep 2009 23:12 #38512

JoJo,
I've done that before. Just unwound the whole thing and put it in the washer. Yes it took time to iron it. The hardest part was refolding in so the selvedges lined up.
Frances
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