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TOPIC: Fusible battings -?

19 Oct 2009 16:46 #39741

  • eileenkny
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Personally, I don't like the fusible battings, Hobbs or whatever. Takes a long time to fuse it and heaven help you if you don't catch a tuck! Had to pull the whole darn thing apart.
eileenkny

from the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY
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19 Oct 2009 16:28 #39737

I was interested to read about your experience with Hobbs 80-20 fusible, Peachykeen. Has anyone else used that particular batting? I'm wondering if it would be user-friendly for a queen size quilt. I've tried sprays and pins, and nothing has been satisfactory.
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18 Oct 2009 13:54 #39648

  • drj2athome
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Thanks, Mandysilk. I do have a can of the 505. I still wonder about the fusible. Since one side is fusible which do you fuse it to, the top or the backing?

Jan
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18 Oct 2009 12:02 #39641

No, you do not HAVE to thread or pin baste if you are using a spray basting or fusible batting. That said I have found that if I am using spray basting on a large quilt top it helps to pin down the outside edges as these tend to get pulled and tugged and work their way loose pretty easily. Also the one and only time I used fusible batting I had real issues with shifting, so I tend to avoid it now. I figure it would be ok for small quilts, but not for bigger ones (used mine on a crib size)
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18 Oct 2009 08:34 #39615

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If you use the spray or the fusible batting do you still baste the quilt??? thanks, Jan
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14 Mar 2009 16:24 #33302

An extra pair of hands definitely helps, I'm lucky we meet in the local village hall every week, so there are plenty of big tables and extra hands. Good luck Lynn! Ali

in central England
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13 Mar 2009 16:58 #33250

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OK. You all make it sound so easy. Guess I will do this with a couple when my sister visits next week! LOL She's gonna love this one!
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13 Mar 2009 14:10 #33238

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alibeoley wrote:
I think you are possibly spraying too much, it only needs a light misting to stick the layers together. If you're working on the floor or table you should lay some plastic or newspaper alongside the area you're spraying, just move it around as you go, so you catch any overspray. Also, you should spray the batting, not the fabric.

Lay your backing fabric down and tape/pin it to the surface you're working on. Make sure it's smooth and well anchored, but not stretched. Next lay the batting on top and get it smoothed out. Then fold half of it back on itself and spray lightly with 505 (remember to move your plastic bag / newspaper around next to where you're spraying to avoid overspray). Fold the batting back down and smooth/pat it down without stretching - this only needs a light touch. Repeat with the other half. Lay the quilt top down and get it smoothed out so you can check it's in the right position and doesn't have any glaring lumps & bumps. Again, fold back half, lightly spray the batting and fold the top back down. Smooth lightly to stick, make any adjustments needed to get the top flat and square, the glue is only tacky and you can lift and reposition the fabric. Repeat for the other half and hey presto, one sandwiched quilt! Magic stuff :D

This is how I do it, too, except that I only spray about eight to ten inches at a time, from one side to the other. Then I gently lower the top (or the batting, depending on which layer I'm doing) just that far, smooth it out, and spray another eight to ten inches.

The secret is to have everything flat and smoothed out before you start, though, and to start spraying across the centre of the quilt.

Anne in Vancouver, Canada

in Vancouver, Canada
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13 Mar 2009 12:59 #33234

I think you are possibly spraying too much, it only needs a light misting to stick the layers together. If you're working on the floor or table you should lay some plastic or newspaper alongside the area you're spraying, just move it around as you go, so you catch any overspray. Also, you should spray the batting, not the fabric.

Lay your backing fabric down and tape/pin it to the surface you're working on. Make sure it's smooth and well anchored, but not stretched. Next lay the batting on top and get it smoothed out. Then fold half of it back on itself and spray lightly with 505 (remember to move your plastic bag / newspaper around next to where you're spraying to avoid overspray). Fold the batting back down and smooth/pat it down without stretching - this only needs a light touch. Repeat with the other half. Lay the quilt top down and get it smoothed out so you can check it's in the right position and doesn't have any glaring lumps & bumps. Again, fold back half, lightly spray the batting and fold the top back down. Smooth lightly to stick, make any adjustments needed to get the top flat and square, the glue is only tacky and you can lift and reposition the fabric. Repeat for the other half and hey presto, one sandwiched quilt! Magic stuff :D

in central England
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13 Mar 2009 12:54 #33233

QuilterLynn wrote:
I've used the 505 twice for regular and queen size quilts and found management of the spray (sticky all over and in the air???) difficult. I had taped down my back but had a hard time laying it all out and getting smooth was tough.

ANy secrets beside having an accomplice?

Lynn

I spread out the batting on the living room floor (over an old flat sheet so the spray doesn't get all over the carpet), then put the batting on top. Then I spray one half at a time and put the top on, starting in the middle. I lay it out the best I can, then use my long rotary cutting ruler to smooth it, holding it perpendicular to the quilt (using the thin edge). It's easier than using only hands. After I get the top the way I want it, I turn the whole thing over and do the same with the back. And yes, with large quilts, an accomplice (usually my daughter) is a big help as my back doesn't like all that bending for long periods of time. One other hint: the spray will get all over your shoes too, so wear old ones and not sandals unless you like sticky toes. Don't ask how I know this.
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13 Mar 2009 11:56 #33230

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I've used the 505 twice for regular and queen size quilts and found management of the spray (sticky all over and in the air???) difficult. I had taped down my back but had a hard time laying it all out and getting smooth was tough.

ANy secrets beside having an accomplice?

Lynn
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12 Mar 2009 12:45 #33203

I machine-quilt all of my projects that are lap size and smaller. I use Hobbs 80/20 Fusible batting and have for years. I always had puckers in my backings no matter how hard I tried get them smooth until I discovered fusible batting. I have a large table that I can iron on but I still have to do lap size quilts in sections. If I make a mistake, I can just pull the fabric off the batting and start over. I love it! I used to buy the queen size packages by the case. Two packages usually gave my enough for three quilts with one pieced batting. I finally decided to splurge and I bought a roll of it. Now I can just cut off exactly what I need so there's not as much waste. The batting is also flat on the roll whereas the packaged battings are rolled tightly and wrinkled. I've never had any problem with residue on the needle. The quilts soften up after washing. My quilting has improved since I don"t have to worry about the layers shifting. I can't live without it. I have no experience with the sprays so I can't compare but this is JMHO on what works for me.

Diana in Hornell, NY
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Experts use fusible batting 12 Mar 2009 07:13 #33200

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I am also on the eQuilter.com forum, and the expert quilter who runs that one says she uses fusible batting for all of her quilts - many of which have won awards. So it must work well once you get the technique down.

BethMI
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12 Mar 2009 07:03 #33199

Just a quick addition, I have used 2 other brands of basting spray and found them equally as good as the 505. Wasn't that thrilled with the fusible batting except on a small project.
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