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TOPIC: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM

Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 09:20 #80712

  • beckyezra
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sorry about the misunderstanding, i wasnt clear!
1.5 cup chopped chocolate or chocolate chips
heavy cream/dubble cream/ the one is with 35% fat
i hope it is clear, more questions i will answer as soon as possible.
i promise you that you will love it!!
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 07:38 #80707

  • PosyP
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lotti wrote:
or 1 cup double cream (i.e. whipping cream) ???
or the really heavy cream that is beyond whipping - i.e. similar to clotted cream ???
In UK, in order of 'thickness', we have single cream, whipping cream, double cream and extra heavy double cream, then clotted cream. Single cream is pouring ie for coffee etc, but a bit too runny for whipping. Whipping as it indicates, is just thick enough for whipping. Double, a bit thicker, slow pouring (usually needs a bit of help with a spoon) still whip-able. Extra heavy, definitely need help from a spoon to move, but still can be whipped. Where as clotted cream - perfect as it is, like soft butter, ideal with fresh scones strawberry jam & butter...............................


Sorry, personal mummmm, drool moment there just talking about it. :wink:


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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 07:26 #80706

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Reetzbobeetz wrote:
I have 'dabbled' with cream myself quite a bit. 8) Ah I miss the days when we used to get milk delivered to our door every morning in glass bottles with the foil lids. And if you got to it first (this was difficult in a family of nine!) you could skim the couple of inches of cream off the top into your bowl of porridge. Yum, yum! :lol:
8) Although it is now every other day, I still get my milk delivered in glass bottles with foil tops :D some of the old methods are so much more 'green' :wink:


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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 06:05 #80701

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Reetzbobeetz wrote:
I have 'dabbled' with cream myself quite a bit. 8) Ah I miss the days when we used to get milk delivered to our door every morning in glass bottles with the foil lids. And if you got to it first (this was difficult in a family of nine!) you could skim the couple of inches of cream off the top into your bowl of porridge. Yum, yum! :lol:

What a memory jogger that is! A man named Mr. Bacon (how did I remember that??? :shock: ) would deliver glass bottles of milk to Grandmother's house and we would try to be close at hand when she opened them to lick the cream from the paper stopper! :D


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That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived !
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 05:56 #80700

I have 'dabbled' with cream myself quite a bit. 8) Ah I miss the days when we used to get milk delivered to our door every morning in glass bottles with the foil lids. And if you got to it first (this was difficult in a family of nine!) you could skim the couple of inches of cream off the top into your bowl of porridge. Yum, yum! :lol:
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 05:19 #80698

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or 1 cup double cream (i.e. whipping cream) ???
or the really heavy cream that is beyond whipping - i.e. similar to clotted cream ???
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 04:39 #80697

  • PosyP
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beckyezra wrote:
chocolate cake (very light) too dangerous !!!
i love this cake ! it takes 5 minutes to make, ...and 5 minutes to finish it as well...

dark and light chocolate cake

1.5 cup flour
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup cocoa
1 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/3 cup oil (not olive oil)
1 cup warm water
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1.5 broken chocolate or chocolate chip
1 cup dabble cream

mix all in a mixer, you can do it with electric mixer or by hand.
until smooth.
poor to oiled baking form, bake 180 deg. (dont know f,sorry) for 35 minutes

when it is baked, there are a lot of craks on the top of the cake, try to see if it is cooked with wooden stick.

let cool, enjoy it with little vanilla pudding or just the cake
Looks great - a couple of queries for clarification, when you say 'dabble cream' is it thin,quick pouring 'dabbles' or thick, slow pouring 'dabbles'? and "1.5 broken chocolate or chocolate chip" 1.5 whats? could it be cups or bars of chocolate?


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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 15 May 2012 04:28 #80696

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chocolate cake (very light) too dangerous !!!
i love this cake ! it takes 5 minutes to make, ...and 5 minutes to finish it as well...

dark and light chocolate cake

1.5 cup flour
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup cocoa
1 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/3 cup oil (not olive oil)
1 cup warm water
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1.5 broken chocolate or chocolate chip
1 cup dabble cream

mix all in a mixer, you can do it with electric mixer or by hand.
until smooth.
poor to oiled baking form, bake 180 deg. (dont know f,sorry) for 35 minutes

when it is baked, there are a lot of craks on the top of the cake, try to see if it is cooked with wooden stick.

let cool, enjoy it with little vanilla pudding or just the cake
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 11 May 2012 01:15 #80430

  • lotti
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fab - thank you - have just printed the copycat recipe...
and, as i always consider those restaurant cornbreads to be fabulously tasty but too sweet - i can just leave out the sugar - yeahhh
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 10 May 2012 03:33 #80399

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anniequi wrote:
This is an easy, but popular recipe, especially for a "covered dish". Serve warm, but cool is just as good.
The recipe calls for JIFFY Corn Muffin Mix, but it may be found only in the U.S. In that case, wheat flour and fine polenta may be substituted.
I tried to locate the correct equivalents to help, but excuse me if I erred!

BAKED CORN CASSEROLE

1 cup (225ml) butter
4 eggs
17 ounces (482grams) drained whole corn
17 ounces (482grams) cream style corn
2 cups (450ml) sour cream
2 8.5 ounce boxes Jiffy corn muffin mix (480grams fine polenta & wheat flour)
salt & pepper, to taste
2 cups (450ml) shredded Swiss, Gruyere or Emmentaler cheese
Optional: chopped green chiles; french fried onions - to taste

Mix all together and bake at 350*F (176.6*C) for 30-35 minutes in glass/ceramic baking dish.
Serves 12
from CDKitchen

and anniequi :)

Looks really good (if huge) Do you rub the butter into the Jiffy corn muffin mix first or blend it with the sour cream to get it mixed through?

By the way I went hunting and found thishttp://www.food.com/recipe/jiffy-corn-muffin-mix-copycat-345502 which could be useful for those of us unable to get hold of the original.


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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 09 May 2012 19:09 #80386

Thanks for bringing to my attention that the recipe I gave, does indeed make a large quantity. Though I must say, there is not a morsel left when it's served at our quilt guild covered dish with our 30+ members and 20+ guests.
So, I will have another go at it, using the original recipe and a few other adjustments.

BAKED CORN CASSEROLE

1/2 cup butter, melted
1 15 ounce drained whole corn
1 15 ounces cream style corn
1 8.5 ounced pkg corn muffin mix (Jiffy)
1 cup sour cream
2 eggs
1 to 1 1/2 cups shredded Cheddar (May substitute other cheese such as Swiss, Gruyere)
Optional: add chopped green chile peppers, french fried onions - to taste

Preheat oven to 350*F (176.6C)

In a large bowl, combine whole corn, cream corn, corn muffin mix, sour cream, eggs, and melted butter. Fold in half the cheese with the mixture, reserving the other half for the top later.
Pour into greased 9 x 13 inch casserole dish.
Bake 45 minutes in the 350*F oven. Remove from oven and top with the rest of the cheddar.
Return to oven for 5 to 10 minutes or until cheese melts.
Let stand 5 minutes before serving.
6 to 8 servings
ENJOY!
Last Edit: 15 May 2012 21:05 by anniequi.
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 06 May 2012 10:17 #80266

  • NanaPie
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Blackberry Buckle

1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar, divided
1 egg, beaten
2 1/2 cups all purpose flour, divided
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup milk
2 cups blackberries (or blueberries)
2 teaspoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup cold butter

1. In a large mixing bowl, cream shortening and 1/2 cup sugar until light and fluffy. Add egg and mix well. Combine 2 cups flour, baking powder, and salt. Add alternately with the milk, beating after each addition. Spread into greased 9 inch square baking dish.

2. Toss blackberries with lemon juice. Sprinkle over batter. In a small bowl, combine cinnamon and remaining sugar and flour, and cut in butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle over berries.

3. Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Serve with dollop of whipping cream or scoop of ice cream. Refrigerate leftovers.
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 06 May 2012 02:37 #80256

Another Scottish recipe

Cranachan Recipe
Scottish Cranachan is a very quick, easy recipe. It is also a very festive recipe and perfect for any celebration especially Christmas, Hogmanay and rounds off a Burns' Night Supper beautifully. However, Scottish Cranachan is too good though to save just for special occasions and is especially good in the summer making the most of delicious Scottish raspberries for a truly authentic recipe but don't worry if you can't find Scottish, use any raspberries with the wonderful ingredients in the Cranachan it tastes good anyway.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Ingredients:
· 2 oz/ 55g pinhead oatmeal
· 250g fresh raspberries
· 1 pint/475ml heavy/double cream
· 3 tbsp malt whisky
· 1 tbsp + extra Scottish heather honey to serve (optional)
Preparation:
· Heat a large heavy based skillet/frying pan on the stove until hot. Add the oats and stirring constantly, toast the oats until they have a light, nutty smell and is just beginning to change colour. Do not leave unattended, the oatmeal can quickly burn. Remove the oats from the pan.
· Keep a handful of the raspberries to one side, place the remaining raspberries into a food processor and whiz once or twice to create a thick purée, do not over blend it's fine if there are a few large lumps of whole raspberry.
· In a large bowl whisk the cream and whisky to form firm peaks.
· In either a glass trifle bowl, or individual serving glasses layer the dessert starting with cream, followed by raspberries, followed by oatmeal. You can either make small layers repeating several times or layer 1/3 of each to fill the bowl or glass. Always finish with a layer of cream and a light sprinkling of oatmeal.
· Cover the bowl or glasses with plastic wrap and chill for a minimum of one hour or several if possible.
To serve, drizzle over a little extra honey (optional) and Scottish Shortbread .
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Re: RECIPES from the TQS FORUM 06 May 2012 02:35 #80255

Here is the recipe for Scottish Clootie Dumpling

Clootie Dumpling Recipe
This is a traditional Scottish recipe for a hot pudding. Traditionally served at New Year it has become popular throughout the winter or colder months of the year. Sometimes spelt "cloutie" it is named after the cloth or "clout" that it is boiled in. This recipe has many variants and is often handed down from generation to generation.

Ingredients
4 oz wholemeal flour
6 oz fine brown breadcrumbs
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
4 oz beef suet, finely chopped (butter may be substituted)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons black treacle
1 teaspoon ground cumin
4 oz sultanas
4 oz currants
2 eggs
1 large cooking apple
Juice and zest of one lemon
Fresh orange juice to mix
A square of cotton or linen cloth.

Method
Boil the cloth for a few minutes and then spread it out on a table and quickly sprinkle with about a tablespoonful of wholemeal flour and tossing the flour to coat the main centre of the cloth quite thickly in order to minimise the mixture sticking to the cloth.
Now turn your attention to the actual mixture itself. Using a bowl, stir the treacle into the eggs and then place into the bowl with all the other ingredients. This should then be mixed to a firm consistency adding water as required.
Place mixture in the centre of the cloth. Bring up the edges and tie with a string, leaving a little space in order to let the mixture expand. Hold the tied ends and pat the cloth into a round shape. Place the pudding into a pot of boiling water, which should come to approximately halfway or two thirds up the side of the pot (with the bag placed inside). Cover and simmer gently for 4 hours topping up with water as required.

Once the pudding is cooked plunge it into cold water for about one minute to release it from the cloth. Remove the pudding to a wire tray and untie, covering with a plate and reverse it peeling the cloth as you do so. Then place the pudding into a hot oven to dry off the skin.

The pudding is best served warm (having left the pudding to cool for 20 minutes or so) and is then traditionally served with either cream or brandy butter. It is unusual but not unknown for it also to be served with warm custard.
It may also be used the following morning, fried as a breakfast dish or wrapped in silver foil and reheated in a warm oven.
Last Edit: 06 May 2012 02:39 by scottishquilter.
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