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TOPIC: Babylock Crescendo

Babylock Crescendo 07 Jan 2018 13:20 #143207

  • JudithA
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Sue,
Years ago I bought a new very expensive top-of the-line machine out of the box. It had problems. It still has some very aggravating problems.

I wish I had bought the floor model. They don't put top-of-the line problem machines on the floor to demo. That would turn customers away.
They put top-of-the-line machines on the floor that work perfectly.

Judy
Last Edit: 07 Jan 2018 13:24 by JudithA. Reason: Clarity
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Babylock Crescendo 07 Jan 2018 10:43 #143199

  • Louise
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Sue
CONGRATULATIONS! You won't regret your purchase. The floor model sounds like a good deal. You really don't have to worry about the Crescendo. It's a workhorse of a machine. I've had mine for four years, have sewing sessions almost every day and never had a problem. Of course, I clean it regularly as per the instructions and take it in for a yearly checkup. Happy sewing!

(Already had my sewing session for today, so I'm off to watch my Buffalo Bills in their first playoff game in 17 years! It's amazing how much good will this has generated.)

Niagara Falls, New York
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Babylock Crescendo 06 Jan 2018 18:19 #143194

Sue, that sounds like a wonderful specialty! I'll be curious to see what Louise thinks about a floor model vs. new in the box. I know an employee at a sewing center who bought a floor model and I always thought it allowed her to buy with confidence knowing how the store was about their machines. You'll have to share a photo after you get her home and set up! How exciting
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Babylock Crescendo 06 Jan 2018 18:18 #143193

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Sue, I bought a Crescendo floor model, it was absolutely perfect. Then decided I really needed the Destiny which adds the embroidery function. So I traded the Crescendo in and got that. Someone bought "my" Crescendo within a couple of days. Unless the machine was abused by people trying it out, it would probably be in great condition.

I do use the laser function when walking foot quilting diagonal lines, it's so much simpler than without it. I haven't got into the embroidery too much yet but I do use the stylus.

The only thing I would change is to give it the option of having a 1.8 and a 2.2 stitch length, there's only 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5. But not a deal breaker for me.
Kathy
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Babylock Crescendo 06 Jan 2018 16:55 #143192

Thank you both so much! I've done quite a bit of research today, and I am going to get the Crescendo. Everywhere I looked, people were liking it. And...(I'm a retired Nurse Practitioner) - recent research is showing that learning NEW things (not necessarily doing mental exercises such as crossword puzzles, etc) helps prevent Alzheimer/s Disease, so learning things like the stylus and laser guide are good challenges.

The store gave me a quote. I can save $600 by purchasing the floor model versus buying a new machine in the box. Any opinions on that? my thoughts are that since this machine is so expensive, what's an extra $600 - if I got a "lemon" I would always wonder if it was because it had been somewhat used. Your thoughts?

And yes Louise, finding new things to sew is always fun, but I'll admit that I enjoy everyday sewing as much as ever. My "specialty" is repurposing vintage linens and designing new patterns.
Thanks again for your thoughtful replies!
Sue
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Babylock Crescendo 06 Jan 2018 13:00 #143191

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Hi Sue --
How great that someone who has been sewing as long as you have has found yet another reason to love sewing. I have also been sewing for well over 50 years, and only discovered quilting when I retired. Since I no longer needed all the clothes I was sewing, quilting came along (Thanks to Georgia Bonesteel and Alex Anderson) to keep me learning new things and building on skills I've had forever.

Regarding the use of the stylus, I've never really used it. I did some experimenting with it, but found that it was more trouble than it was worth for my purposes. The laser has come in handy a few times, but it's not a feature I would miss. I really like the stitch regulator. Having said that, after doing a lot of experimenting, I don't use the round disc part (can't remember what it's called) that you tuck under the fabric when free motioning. I guess it's supposed to keep track of your hand speed, but I found it cumbersome and just another thing to keep track of. So, after setting up the machine for FMQ, I just set the stitch regular to a speed I'm comfortable with and stitches per inch and go to it. It still takes some practice to find the combination of speed and number of stitches to get it right, but the regulator let's you just concentrate on your hands. Once you set the speed, the machine won't run away with you no matter how hard to press on that presser foot. One less variable to worry about.

I've also had experience with the Bernina stitch regulator. For me, the Babylock stitch regulator was more dependable. I'm convinced, however, there is no real short cut to learning FMQ. It still takes practice, but a regulator helps a great deal. You have to be sure to follow the set up directions carefully, plugging in things where they are supposed to go. I speak from experience. When I first got my machine, I was so excited to try the stitch regulator, that I didn't have the unit plugged in properly, and couldn't understand why it wasn't working. Thank heaven, my dealer has a lot of patience with me!

Good luck with your purchase!

Niagara Falls, New York
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Babylock Crescendo 06 Jan 2018 12:48 #143190

Yes! The laser alone is worth it and why I wanted my FMQ to work with this machine. I have 4 or 5 quilts (2 king size) with it since I bought it - that's why I was so frustrated. But I believe we understand each other better now. :)

I don't use the stylus that often, but anytime a pattern calls for drawing a diagonal line, you can skip that step with the laser. As a matter of fact, I'm using the laser right now for a good/true1/4" on some pillow shams im working on. I *almost* feel guilty for having it so easy with this. As for the stitch regulation, that is still an area of practice for each person, but the speed control does help.
I had a Janome 6600 and didn't think I'd ever give it up, but I am that thrilled with the Crescendo!
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Babylock Crescendo 06 Jan 2018 11:54 #143188

Louise (and everyone else),
Thank you for this thread. I am considering the Crescendo myself. I've had a BL Katherine (which I like but do not LOVE) and a smaller Janome for traveling in our RV.

My questions are these: The BIG difference between the Crescendo and the Aria are the stylus and the laser sewing line. Do you feel you use these features enough to take the step to the Crescendo? RE: FMQ, how well does this machine regulate stitches? I have been sewing over 50 years, but just began quilting last August, and I am fully addicted. I've already finished 4 major quilts, one of which I FMQ'd with my Katherine (an exercise is profanity! - LOL)
Thank you,
Sue
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Babylock Crescendo 03 Jan 2018 08:04 #143134

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Glad to hear that things are looking up. One of the things that makes free motion a challenge is that there are so many variables to control -- speed, hand motion, thread, tension, correct needle etc. When I was having a problem with skipped stitches using the clear monofilament thread, I read that I was using a needle with too large an eye. Now I'm always sure to use a needle with a small eye -- i.e. not a top stitching needle. Solved the problem, and no difficulties since. So much to learn, but lots of satisfaction when we finally get it right.

Niagara Falls, New York
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Babylock Crescendo 02 Jan 2018 23:44 #143130

Thank you so much for your input, encouragement and tips. It was very appreciated.
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Babylock Crescendo 02 Jan 2018 22:21 #143129

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I am glad to hear it is working better!
Personally, I have to take it easy around curves when FMQ to get good stitches.
Good tip about the inserting the needle.

Judy
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Babylock Crescendo 02 Jan 2018 21:29 #143128

Yes, it auto corrected to FEW - it was supposed to say FMQ. Tonight I put in a new needle, a newly wound bobbin and relocated my upright cone thread holder. It seems to have worked! My swirls are looking much better without all of the thread skips.
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Babylock Crescendo 02 Jan 2018 20:16 #143126

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Hi Dsincamino,
When you say "my hand and machine speed are in sync," that sounds like free-motion stitching. Are you doing free-motion stitching?
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Babylock Crescendo 02 Jan 2018 14:12 #143118

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So sorry and surprised to hear about your problem. It must be truly frustrating. I've had the Crescendo for years and never experienced a problem with anything. In the past I had the same problem with another machine. After lots of visits to the dealer, I discovered that I wasn't pushing the needle up all the way into the slot, when I changed the needle!! (I sure felt silly.) You also have to be sure that the needle is inserted with the flat side of the shaft facing away from you. I'm not sure that these things are the problem, but it's a simple thing worth checking out before you seek the dealer's help.

Other than that, you need to keep seeing your dealer until the problem is solved. My experience is that Babylock is very good about customer satisfaction, so if you need to keep going up the ladder to get the problem solved, keep at it. These machines are a big investment, and you want to feel confident that you made a good decision. Best of luck.

Niagara Falls, New York
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