Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2

TOPIC: Printing on fabric

Re: Printing on fabric 27 Mar 2013 12:46 #99923

  • Margo
  • Margo's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 6500
  • Thank you received: 10
Welcome to the forum Shamrock3463!

This is an older topic on the forum. For updated info about printers you might want to send a personal e-mail to Jeannie:
[url]community/my-profile/jeaniesa[/url]

and review her tutorials in her TQS classroom: [url]learn/classrooms/[/url]


It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter
That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived !
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: Printing on fabric 27 Mar 2013 12:41 #99921

What type of ink jet printers is everyone using. I would like to get one and start off small with larger capabilities. Please help! Thanks Joan
The administrator has disabled public write access.

17 Jan 2010 19:24 #42523

Miles661ca wrote:
I print on fabric quite frequently. I have never used an additive to the fabric I'm using (personally, I think it's just a sales gimmick- and it apparently has succeeded). I ironmy fabric (the higher the thread-count the better) to freezer paper, cut to size and put throug my printer set to the highest resolution print setting. I also up the ink saturation (as noted above). I peel off the freezer paper, let the print set for a while and then iron to set. Done. I've never had an issue with fading (although wih ALL fabrics that is inevitable). Natutral and even artificial light are the enemies of printed fabrics from a home printer. Ironically, my cheapest, smallest HP printer works the best.

INTERESTING!!!! I am going to try that some time!!! I would love to be able to print on commercial fabrics!!! Thanks for the tips!
Last Edit: by mknavy90.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

16 Jan 2010 21:21 #42496

I print on fabric quite frequently. I have never used an additive to the fabric I'm using (personally, I think it's just a sales gimmick- and it apparently has succeeded). I ironmy fabric (the higher the thread-count the better) to freezer paper, cut to size and put throug my printer set to the highest resolution print setting. I also up the ink saturation (as noted above). I peel off the freezer paper, let the print set for a while and then iron to set. Done. I've never had an issue with fading (although wih ALL fabrics that is inevitable). Natutral and even artificial light are the enemies of printed fabrics from a home printer. Ironically, my cheapest, smallest HP printer works the best.
Last Edit: by Miles661ca.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

31 Aug 2009 16:21 #38033

Thank you Beth for going straight to the source. I love the product and It is good to know that I am not putting myself at any more risk than regular everyday life. An un founded rumor can spread like wild fire. Thanks again for putting out the fire. Betty Ann
Last Edit: by bettyannseeman.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Bubble Jet Set - safe as fabric softener and paper towels! 31 Aug 2009 15:50 #38032

  • BethMI
  • BethMI's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 418
  • Thank you received: 5
Continuation of my earlier post about the relative safety of Bubble Jet Set...

Mr. Jenkins' point was that the only "carcinogen" in Bubble Jet Set is formaldehyde and that formaldehyde is already present everywhere, anyway.

He referred me to information about formaldehyde which was drawn from the ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry). That is the congressionally mandated agency to perform specific functions concerning the effect on public health of hazardous substances in the environment. That agency’s information on formaldehyde is available at
http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/phs111.html

That information basically says that our own bodies produce some formaldehyde and that we are exposed to it daily via many routes. It is in many home products and you may breathe in formaldehyde while using these products. Latex paint, fingernail hardener, and fingernail polish release a large amount of formaldehyde to the air. Plywood and particle board, as well as furniture and cabinets made from them, fiberglass products, new carpets, decorative laminates, and some permanent press fabrics give off a moderate amount of formaldehyde. Some paper products, such as grocery bags and paper towels, give off small amounts of formaldehyde. Because these products contain formaldehyde, you may also be exposed on the skin by touching or coming in direct contact with them. You may also be exposed to small amounts of formaldehyde in the food you eat. You are not likely to be exposed to formaldehyde in the water you drink because it does not last a long time in water.

Many other home products contain and give off formaldehyde although the amount has not been carefully measured. These products include household cleaners, carpet cleaners, disinfectants, cosmetics, medicines, fabric softeners, glues, lacquers, and antiseptics. You may also breathe formaldehyde if you use unvented gas or kerosene heaters indoors or if you or someone else smokes a cigar, cigarette, or pipe indoors.

You are exposed to small amounts of formaldehyde in the air. It occurs from both natural and man made sources although combustion is the largest source. If you live in an unpopulated area, you may be exposed to about 0.2 parts per billion (ppb) of formaldehyde in the air outdoors. In suburban areas, you may be exposed to about 2–6 ppb of formaldehyde. If you live in a heavily populated area or near some industries, you may be exposed to 10–20 ppb. You may also be exposed to higher levels of formaldehyde during rush hour commutes in highly populated areas because it is formed in automobile and truck exhaust.

So, quilters ... if you have paint on your walls or carpet, furniture, cabinets, fabric softener, fingernail polish, grocery bags, etc. in your home or if you drive a vehicle or if you use cosmetics or are EVER around smokers, you are already “exposed” to formaldehyde.

Personally, I’ll take my chances with Bubble Jet Set rather than jettison all of these products from my home and forego riding on the highway!

I think that we can forget about the supposed "dangers" of using this product!

BethMI
Last Edit: by BethMI.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Response from the inventor of Bubble Jet Set 31 Aug 2009 15:30 #38030

  • BethMI
  • BethMI's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 418
  • Thank you received: 5
Before a rumor like this runs amok on the internet, I thought I should inquire of the company that makes this product.

I emailed the manufacturer, the C.Jenkins Company, about the possible carcinogenic properties of Bubble Jet Set, and this is what the inventor of the product said about this topic:

"Hello

My name is Jerome Jenkins and I am the inventor of the Bubble Jet Set 2000 solution. I would highly appreciate it if you could post this information onto the site where the rumor exist.

The only chemical in the Bubble Jet Set 2000 that is even mentioned in the same sentence with cancer is formaldehyde. However, the parts per volume is .001% which it all cases 3%-6% is allowed. Which you can easily see that we are well below the maximum numbers. However, there was a study taken about 8 years ago on the facts & the effects of the chemical. I will let you read it word for word and you will see how the rumor is simply a rumor. Also, all our customers have access to our MSDS sheets where they can research the chemicals in the Bubble Jet set just to learn how we make the product. Also, the ink is much more hazardous in your printer than the Bubble Jet Set 2000. Just as any household product under your cabinet.

I would love to answer all questions as this is a subject we would love to dismiss."

He then attached the information on formaldehyde, which is highly technical and which I will copy and insert into my next forum posting.

I would wager that innumerable household products contain these very low levels of formaldehyde. If we can accept them in those products, why not in Bubble Jet Set?

I think that we should all remember that even the commercially printed fabrics we purchase had chemicals applied to them to "prepare them for dying," which we later wash out eventually.

BethMI
Last Edit: 31 Aug 2009 16:05 by BethMI.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

30 Aug 2009 23:04 #38007

"Life is fatal." Funny!
Last Edit: by ipquilter.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Carcinogenic? 30 Aug 2009 22:16 #38006

  • BethMI
  • BethMI's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 418
  • Thank you received: 5
I'll bet it is carcinogenic if you DRINK it, but not if you apply it to the fabric then wash it out afterward as directed.

And I'll bet other brands of pre-printed sheets are carcinogenic if you eat them.

Life is fatal.

BethMI
Last Edit: by BethMI.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

30 Aug 2009 15:56 #37992

I came across a rumor today from a Yahoo forum posting, that something in Bubble Jet is carcinogenic. Has anyone got a source for that rumor? I made a photoquilt for a good friend struggling with cancer and I have been surfing the internet today to find something to verify this rumor.
Last Edit: by PattiSure.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

19 Jul 2009 13:51 #36744

  • Lorchen
  • Lorchen's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 2639
  • Thank you received: 50
Just a little warning: "prepared fabrics" usually means that they are prepared to take dyes more easily. But you would still have to 'set' the colours, according to the type of dye used (check with manufacturer if in doubt). Very often a hot and dry iron will set colour and make it permanent.

Lorchen
From the edge of Sherwood Forest, home of Robin Hood
Last Edit: by Lorchen.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Printing on fabric 19 Jul 2009 12:15 #36743

  • PosyP
  • PosyP's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 4105
  • Thank you received: 360
Another thing to investigate is what type of inks your printer uses.
If it is dye based then you will need the mordant of Bubble jet, but if it is pigment based then it just needs ironing. Epsom Durabrite inks are pigment based. You also get a better result if your printer has a 'L' shaped paper feed, than if your printer has a 'U'shaped paper feed.

I know this because I have a friend who teaches this subject and is writing a book about it, and I have made some samples up for her to include.

Rosemary

P.S. I bought my first printer, an epsom, on her advice earlier this year and am very pleased with it.


Embroideress Extrordinaire & Mad Hatter
Last Edit: by PosyP.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Bubble Jet Set for HP Printers 17 Jul 2009 18:19 #36709

  • BethMI
  • BethMI's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 418
  • Thank you received: 5
If you have a Hewlett Packard printer, you should go to the cjenkins website at http://www.cjenkinscompany.com and order Hewlett Packard Bubble Jet Set 2000.

It is specially formulated for HP printers and the type of inks they use.

BethMI
Last Edit: by BethMI.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

17 Jul 2009 14:08 #36707

I do like Sewdreamy and treat fabrics myself and iron it onto freezer paper. I was in a hurry this past weekend and didn't have anything made up (the directions say it's better to make it when you need it). Anyway I bought some printed treasures and the colors did not come out as deep and rich.
Last Edit: by PattiSure.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2
Time to create page: 0.379 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum