Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: surface design

21 Apr 2008 05:56 #17179

  • eileenkny
  • eileenkny's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 1951
  • Thank you received: 122
I'm not sure an art quilt has to have embellishments. Three art quilters have put me in awe for years. Ricky Tims, Caryl Breyer Fallert and Nancy Crow. I've always thought that their quilts COULD go on a bed if they had to but they give so much more to the world displayed on a wall.
I think what I'm trying to say is that, to me, they've always looked both artistic and functional to me
JMHO
eileenkny

from the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY
Gammill Classic Plus w/IQ
Last Edit: by eileenkny.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

21 Apr 2008 01:35 #17170

This is really interesting--I just posted a thread about my inspiration. Through an inspiring speaker at my guild, I discovered that traditional quilts are MY style. It has totally freed me from feeling that I need to make the trendy quilts I see in magazines, etc. But I also appreciate ALL quilts and I love to see others' work even if it is totally different than mine. Everyone needs to do what they love and what is their own style. I agree that quilt shows need to work more on different categories for art quilts. There's some wonderful and very unusual work out there and it just isn't going to fit into the same category a the "usual" quilt.
Last Edit: by Judymc.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

20 Apr 2008 17:45 #17147

I agree with you Jan. I am in awe of the wonderful works that are more traditional. I totally appreciate them. I think they are equally fabulous and I am sure that I will never be able to do anything like that. I wish that i could. But that is not where my abilities lie. To me, it is silly to compare the two. In the world of art, I would call them two different mediums. An analogy is that there is the art form of printmaking. But within that medium there are many different methods and forms of printmaking; serigraphy, intaglio, engraving, block, etc. One is not better than another, it is just that each person find the medium their talents are best suited to, or the medium that will best accomplish what they are trying to achieve.

I also would hope that this could be an informative discussion that will be one of support; an exchange of information and positive interactions. There is such joy in using ones imagination to create anything. For me, it is a driving force of life.
Last Edit: by Wren1010.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

20 Apr 2008 16:07 #17137

Wren1010 wrote:
I am rather new to quilting, but I have spent much of my life in the art world. I would love to see some interest and enthusiasm for the subject of art quilts in the forum.

So, my thoughts on Ann's original question... There is a whole section of philosophy (aesthetics) devoted to what is considered art and what is not. There is no firm definition because it is constantly evolving and changing. As an artist, it will be what you decide it is or is not. Not every one will agree either. The Impressionists were quite the renegades of their artistic time because they did not adhere to what was considered proper art . Those rules for the standards of acceptable art were dictated by the formal art salons and the Academie de beaux-arts of their time. :D

It is quite fine that art can also have function. That is what designers do. :D :D :D In other words, go for it! LOL!

Wren - thanks for jumping in! I have experienced, and observed, that art quilts can be less than appreciated in the traditional quilt arena. Perhaps it's simply the grey area of definition, or maybe there is some intimidation or even reluctance to change? Quilt guilds can be an example of where there has been apathy and/or criticism. NOT ALL of them :lol: I'm not seeking to be divisive here! I love making traditional quilts, and greatly admire seeing what others have done. I'm often awed to see how someone takes the medium one step further. Embellishment, piecing methods, design, etc. They are ALL art in one sense of the word, right? Any creation is art.
I say hooray for the renegades. Perhaps I am one - or a wannabe. I find myself digging my heels in when, for instance a quilt is observed as not having a "proper" binding. Okay, if you are going to enter it in a competition that has a proper binding as a requirement. But, to me, it sure seems to miss the whole point of the overall beauty or statement or soul of a piece. Those who dare to, for instance, use a facing method on a quilt (which I have done) and/or put yarn on the edge, let alone use raw edge applique' or put found objects (collage) on a quilt, may be the renegades of our time. I say go for it!
I can see that we might be getting into territory of a challenge of defining just what category a quilt falls under, in the instance of a show and/or competition. Is it a functional, bed quilt, or is it a wall quilt/art piece? Is it primarily painted cloth (a'la Hollis Chaterlain). As far as I know, at the present time, the difinition is that the piece requires the three layers (front/batting/back).
More thoughts? Above all, let's be kind in our comments. Haven't we all been to a show and overheard someone saying something like "What IS that **** supposed to be"? Let's do our best to respect others' feelings as well as freedom of speech. 8)
Jan
Last Edit: by fiberwoman.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

20 Apr 2008 14:51 #17131

I am rather new to quilting, but I have spent much of my life in the art world. I would love to see some interest and enthusiasm for the subject of art quilts in the forum.

So, my thoughts on Ann's original question... There is a whole section of philosophy (aesthetics) devoted to what is considered art and what is not. There is no firm definition because it is constantly evolving and changing. As an artist, it will be what you decide it is or is not. Not every one will agree either. The Impressionists were quite the renegades of their artistic time because they did not adhere to what was considered proper art . Those rules for the standards of acceptable art were dictated by the formal art salons and the Academie de beaux-arts of their time. :D

It is quite fine that art can also have function. That is what designers do. :D :D :D In other words, go for it! LOL!
Last Edit: by Wren1010.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

20 Apr 2008 13:35 #17120

Bettyann; how about bubble wrap - the large and the small. Is that firm enough for rubbings? It sure worked great for me as texture when I faux finished a wall :lol:
I'm following Bettyann around now, getting my four in. Tee Hee
I would dearly LOVE to see the Art Quilt section of the forum come alive again. It got heated a while back. :cry:
Jan
Last Edit: by fiberwoman.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

20 Apr 2008 11:35 #17109

I have an Art Quilt group coming to my studio next week and we are going to play with the Shiva Paintsticks. I have been making my own texture plates for rubbings. I have glued all kinds of things to the thick foam door hangers that you can buy at Michael's
Here are some of the things I have used. Several different shaped paper clips, round knit count markers, non slip rug backing, hair combs, plastic placemats, curtin rings, beads, and wire jewlery findings. Anyone else have some suggestions for making texture plates or the use of Shiva Paintsticks. Ann that's three Betty Ann in Florida
Last Edit: by bettyannseeman.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

01 Feb 2008 06:21 #13078

  • eileenkny
  • eileenkny's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Posts: 1951
  • Thank you received: 122
I've been thinking about this a lot lately. Anne, when you make your convergence quilts, you are creating art. Gisela has it right-fun is healthy! It does a body good to love what they create. So have fun, Anne. :wink: :D

from the beautiful Hudson Valley of NY
Gammill Classic Plus w/IQ
Last Edit: by eileenkny.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Re: surface design 17 Jan 2008 21:41 #12075

snowplow3840 wrote:
I am trying to break out of the mold of utilitarian quilted items but am not quite ready to give up the idea of usefulness as well as artistic beauty...

Try looking at it differently. Art quilts ARE useful because:
1) they help you express some emotion or need or just get some idea 'out of your head.'
2) even a simple wall-hanging is useful if gives the viewer joy or makes them think,
3) art quilts a perfect way to get rid of all those little odd embellishments that would be totally impractical on a bed quilt.
4) fun is useful and healthy!!

:D
Gisela
Last Edit: by GiselaT.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

07 Mar 2007 12:13 #1631

I'm no expert either - I observe art much more than I make art! I do belong to an art quilt guild here in Denver, Front Range Contemporary Quilters. The nice thing about art quilts is there are no rules! They come in all shapes, sizes and techniques, from the simple to the heavily embellished. A good example of really simple art quilts is Nancy Crow's new book (the big fat hard cover one - just titled "Nancy Crow" - or the big fat soft cover book, Art Quilts: A Celebration - 400 Stunning Contemporary Designs. What I've seen in those 2 books made me feel a lot more at home with art quilts. The Art Quilts: A Celebration book can keep you busy poring over it for hours and it's only $24.95. The Nancy Crow book is kind of pricey ($65), it's only Nancy's work and contains a lot of narrative from her about her process in making them. Check them out!
Last Edit: by SchnauzerFan.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

25 Feb 2007 01:36 #1361

I'm certainly not an expert, but I don't think it matters one bit. As long as you enjoy what you're doing, I would consider it a success!

By the way, Mom said that she would be more than happy to show you her Christmas quilt if you ever want to see it. Feel free to email me and I will give you her phone number if you are going to be in Harlingen anytime soon!

Take care!
Chelley
Last Edit: by aggiebabe.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

surface design 24 Feb 2007 23:16 #1356

Not sure this is the right place to ask this question but nothing ventured nothing gained. Do quilts have to have a lot of embellishement, fancy quilting etc. and be non useful items to be considered an art quilt? I am trying to break out of the mold of utilitarian quilted items but am not quite ready to give up the idea of usefulness as well as artistic beauty. I have just started a bed quilt for my granddaughter that is my own design but is loosly basd on Ricky's convergence and Chantelle designs combined along with some ideas I have been wanting to try. To me this will be an art bed quilt and maybe it doesn't matter but what does anyone else think?
Last Edit: by snowplow3840.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.194 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum