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Bonnie Browning of AQS talks with Gail Garber about the variety of quilts she has made over the past 30 years. Gail takes us on a personal tour of her very special exhibit at AQS QuiltWEEK Albuquerque 2015 titled From the Land of Enchantment: Thirty Years of Quilts by Gail Garber. Grab a cup of coffee and enjoy the tour.
 

Star Members can learn more about Gail in Show 2111: Working with Curved Flying Geese and Foundation Paper Piecing & Creating a Contemporary Antique Quilt.

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As we shared before, unity can be thought of as everyone in a group working together. Unity represents calmness and order through repetition, either by shape or color. While Variety adds that bit of spice to a quilt without sacrificing the idea of the group working together as a whole. Remember...Unity adds harmony; Variety adds interest. Last week's focus on variety featured a look at what you as a quilter can do by pushing just one design. But how do these two principles come into play when you work within a very narrow palette? Or, let's use the example of how your guild challenge involves working with only a few selected fabrics. How do you achieve interest and variety?

 

In Week 24 we observed how taupe, which can at first appear to be very monochromatic, can in fact comprise a wide range of colors, textures and prints when used by a master quilter such as Yoko Saito.
Her book, Japanese Taupe Color Theory, dispells the notion that quilts and quilted items are dull and anything but boring. The handbags below are a perfect example of quilted works that keep within a narrow palette of color but still offer unity and variety.

Priscilla Knoble (Show 1505) has used her fluency in Japanese and quilting knowledge to share the world of Japanese quilting books with those desiring to make their own pieces. Her understanding of the Japanese esthetic and quilting techniques are a huge aid for those desiring to gain an understanding of the Japanese form of quilting. Priscilla shares Yoko Saito's method for repeating elements to create both unity and variety in the design of a quilt.


 

Unity/Variety
by Priscilla Knoble

Many traditional quilts use the concept of unity by creating multiples of the same block within a quilt.  Sometimes with these quilts, variety is found by using the same quilt blocks, but making them out of a variety of fabrics. Other times you will see a quilt, such as a Baltimore album, where each block is somewhat different, but still has rules of how it belongs within the whole.

If you’ve been to any quilt shows and seen quilts in the exhibitions from Japanese quilters, you will likely not be surprised that patchwork and quilting is an extremely large market in Japan. Although the introduction of this craft to the Japanese was primarily due to the influence of the quilting history in America, as with many things, they have added their own aesthetic and style to much of their work.

Yoko Saito, a celebrated artist known for her unique and intricate designs, is a master of using unity and variety within her quilts and in such a way that is fairly unique to the aesthetic that you often see coming out of Japan.



Ms. Saito loves houses and has written several books and patterns using them as the key design motif. In the Chatter of Houses (Houses, Houses, Houses; 2013; Stitch Publications) she has created an amazing quilt where each of the houses or buildings is unique, yet placed in a pleasing layout of center house blocks with two borders chock full of them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In a completely different vein, in an often seen design arrangement, she will create a quilt that has detailed applique’ on top of a subtle and creative background.  In both the Julstjarna Poinsettia and Floral Bouquet (Floral Bouquet; 2015; Stitch Publications) that she designed, you will notice elements that are quintessential Yoko Saito.

First observe the background and borders that are often made up of at least two, if not three fabrics that are very close in color/pattern. Rather than making these with square designs, Ms. Saito will use gentle curves and scallops. Next she will tend to cover the seams between the borders and the central background with appliqué. In the case of both of these quilts, she uses intricate floral designs with stems, leaves and flowers where the stems follow the seams, all but making the background fabric transition disappear. To add even more interest and depth to the quilt she will use a subtle variety of monochromatic colors to keep your eyes dancing along the pattern. Note the variety of greens used for the leaves in Floral Bouquet or the greys/blues in Julstjarna Poinsettia.

 

The next time you see a pattern you would love to make or if you are designing one yourself, take a chapter out of Yoko Saito’s book and try one of her design techniques yourself.

 

Ricky had a chance to chat with Yoko Saito during the Houston Quilt Festival. Watch the interview and see more of her work.

 

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We'd call this block Criss Cross Applesauce, but we don't think that's its real name. Play Jinny's game and find out for sure.

 
 
 

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Each Judge at Houston chooses a quilt that did not win a prize but struck them as wonderful. David Taylor chose Marilyn Farquhar's See the Leaves for the Tree. Read the sign first to understand her fabric choices and then see this beautiful quilt.

 

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Here's the line up for 2018. Were any of your favorites on our list?

Show 2201: Edyta Sitar
Show 2202: Betty Busby
Show 2203: Wendy Grande
Show 2204: Leni L. Wiener / Jake Simmons
Show 2205: Diane Kirkhart
Show 2206: The Hoop Sisters
Show 2207: Cheryl Lynch / Lauren Vlcek
Show 2208: Maria Shell
Show 2209: Katie Fowler
Show 2210: Katie Pasquini Masopust 
Show 2211: TBD
Show 2212: TBD

Show 2213: Ann Shaw

Get a 1-Year Membership for $49 and a choice of a Free Gift worth up to $24.95. That's up to a 50% savings and a great start to the Quilting New Year. 

 
(Want a Free 1-Year Membership? Look at the bottom of the blog.)
 

A Free 1-Year Membership comes with a purchase of any of these 3 kits (including Ricky's).

Take a look.

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Ricky had a chance to talk to Yoko Saito, a celebrated Japanese quilt artist who is well-known for her detailed work and unique use of taupe color palettes, while in Houston. Acting as her interpreter was Priscilla Knoble (Show 1505: East Meets West: Season Your Quilts with a Japanese Flavor).

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There are still a few days left to take advantage of "Early Bird" pricing for Ricky's 52-week online Photo Challenge. Get Part 1 (26 weeks) for only $149, that's 75% off the regular price and enrollment comes only once a year. What a great gift for that special someone...
 

Early Bird pricing is through November 30, 2017.

Want to see what you'll be able to do after taking the challenge? Take a look at the work of some of Ricky's students.

 

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Frieda Anderson is known for many styles, but fusing is at the top of her list. So, we had a difficult time trying to find her 1st Place Quilt in the Appliqué section. BUT, we discovered it had won in Innovative Piecing. Take a look below. It is hard to tell it is pieced, isn't it? Frieda tells Alex the truth about her quilt, Unfurling, in a short video below the pictures.

 

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Dawn of the New Day was made for the invitational United We Quilt Exhibit curated by the American Quilter's Society to memorialize 9/11. Gail chose to represent the tragedy in a figurative way. Click here to learn more about the quilt.

Star Members can learn how to create quilts like Gail in Show 2111: Working with Curved Flying Geese and Foundation Paper Piecing & Creating a Contemporary Antique Quilt.

DawnoftheNewDaybyGailGarber - 36 Pieces Non-Rotating

DawnoftheNewDaybyGailGarber - 100 Pieces Non-Rotating

DawnoftheNewDaybyGailGarber - 300 Pieces Non-Rotating

DawnoftheNewDaybyGailGarber - 36 Pieces Rotating

DawnoftheNewDaybyGailGarber - 100 Pieces Rotating

DawnoftheNewDaybyGailGarber - 300 Pieces Rotating

Original Photo: Mary Kay Davis

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Dawn of the New Day was made for the invitational United We Quilt Exhibit curated by the American Quilter's Society to memorialize 9/11. Gail chose to represent the tragedy in a figurative way. Click here to learn more about the quilt.

Star Members can learn how to create quilts like Gail in Show 2111: Working with Curved Flying Geese and Foundation Paper Piecing & Creating a Contemporary Antique Quilt.

Original Photo: Mary Kay Davis

NEW...Introducing our 2017 Halo Medallion Kit by Sue Garman  in Batiks!

Kits are now shipping! Order yours now as we have a limited quantity!

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Watch Show 1912: (Free) with Rosa Rojas

Apliquick Rods

 

Apliquick - 3 Holes Microserrated Scissors

 

 Apliquick Ergonomic Tweezers

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