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Kristie Jarchow and the Lincoln Modern Quilt Guild were inspired by "Japandi, a mix of the Japenese design aesthetic of wabi-sabi: finding beauty in the imperfect and the Scandi aesthetic of hygge: intentional intimacy or comfort."

Japandi by Kristie Jarchow of the Lincoln Modern Quilt Guild and others won Third Place, Group & Bee Quilts, sponsored by Modern Quilt Guild, at QuiltCon 2020.

Pieced With: Liz Thanel, Jennifer VanDyke, Judy Crockett and Phyllis Higley

Photos by Mary Kay Davis

 

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Quilt Maker and Pianist, Ricky Tims, and Leather Craftsman, Jonathon Long (keyboardist for Lady Antebellum), created original performances for a FOUR NOTES KEYBOARD CHALLENGE. They were each required to use the same four notes (Eb, G, Ab, and C), to compose an original composition. Here are the results.

 

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!!!ANNOUNCING!!!

THE STIR CRAZY

SCRAP BAG QUILT CHALLENGE!

 

 
Overview
    Entries Deadline September 7, 2020
 
      Quilt Entries must be made from:
          1. A required fabric swatch (provided with purchase of the May 2020 Scrap Bags)
          2. Fabric from Ricky Tims Scrap Bag(s), 
          3. Other fabric as listed in the rules.
 
      If you purchase a Scrap Bag, you are not required to enter.
      The purchase of the May 2020 Scrap Bags acts as your entry fee. 
      The May 2020 Scrap Bag contains the required fabric swatch.
     ONLY 90 BAGS AVAILABLE!

 

GET COMPLETE CONTEST RULES
 
1ST PRIZE - $750 VALUE
$250 Cash
 Plus a 40 Yard Bundle of Ricky Tims' Hand-dyed Fabric
2nd PRIZE - $400 VALUE
$150 Cash
Plus a 20 Yard Bundle of Ricky Tims' Hand-dyed Fabric
 
GET YOUR SCRAP BAG
$24.95 no limit
(Per 15 oz. bag - Almost three yards by weight!)
 SAVE 66%*
*Off the regular price of Ricky Tims' Hand-dyed fabric
 
When dying one-yard pieces of fabric we always have bits of leftover fabric that get dyed as well. These “leftovers" are then torn into smaller pieces and put into scrap bags.
 
These current scrap bags are filled with an assortment of vibrant colors PLUS the required Scrap Bag Challenge Fabric Swatch.
 
 
 
 
 

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Ricky is cleaning house.

If you've ever wanted any of Ricky's delicious Hand-dyed fabrics, or one of his kits or patterns, now is the time!

40% off all Hand-dyed Yards
30% off all Kits (which have discounts built into the regular price)
20% off all Patterns

~also includes~

MIS-DYED Fabrics: $11

These fabrics cannot be duplicated. There was an issue with the recipe or some other factor that pushed them too far away in color from our main fabrics. One-yard by approx. 44” single pieces.

Sale ends on Sunday, May 17, 2020.

Click on a box below to take you where you want to go...

 

 

 

 

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It's time to make the Pinwheel Quilt Block. Alex Anderson shows you how to make this block on point. She has tips and tricks in this LIVE quilt tutorial. BUT you don't have to be there LIVE, it's all recorded (it's just more fun LIVE so you can chat). Also, you don't need to be making the pattern, It has many blocks and lots of learning. This pinwheel block on point is one you can use in many projects. If you want to learn and have a wall hanging at the end, click to get the PDF download of the pattern in our store.

Alex is LIVE on Monday May 11 at 10am PST, 1pm Est, & 6pm London time.

To chat, click here. 

 

 

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There's nothing more adorable than a couple of kids...goats that is. Once again turning natural colors on their ear, June Jaerger makes sure that this cute pair will make you smile in her quilt, Goat Ya.

Learn how June makes her quilts in Show 2610.

GoatYabyJuneJaeger - 35 Pieces Non-Rotating

GoatYabyJuneJaeger - 99 Pieces Non-Rotating

GoatYabyJuneJaeger - 300 Pieces Non-Rotating

GoatYabyJuneJaeger - 35 Pieces Rotating

GoatYabyJuneJaeger - 99 Pieces Rotating

GoatYabyJuneJaeger - 300 Pieces Rotating

Original Photo by Kristin Goedert

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There's nothing more adorable than a couple of kids...goats that is. Once again turning natural colors on their ear, June Jaerger makes sure that this cute pair will make you smile in her quilt, Goat Ya.

Learn how June makes her quilts in Show 2610.

Original Photo by Kristin Goedert

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Three Easy Steps To Save This Lesson As A Pdf:
-Make sure you are logged in.
-Click on the small triangle next to the tool wheel in the upper right hand corner of the page (you'll find it above the Like button).
-Select the pdf. option. Wait a few minutes. It's a large file due to the number of images.
-Your file should appear with the title of the lesson.

Learning any new language, especially color, can be daunting. There are strange and often misunderstood terms such as tints, shades, tones and value. What in the world do all of these obscure sounding words mean? When approached in manageable units, especially color, understanding can become much easier.  Harnessing the language of color can help you gain a deeper understanding and self-confidence when it comes to creating more visual impact with your work.

Most of us are familiar with the basic red, yellow, blue primary color concept. But where did this idea begin? Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) discovered that by shining a beam of light through a prism, he could see the colors of the rainbow.
 

Rainbow Prism. Image courtesy of RookieParenting.com

During the mid-twentieth century, Herbert Ives (1882-1953) took Sir Isaac Newton's theory a step further with his scientific testing to determine that it is possible to create hundreds of colors by using a combination of just three basic colors (yellow, magenta, turquoise). With this discovery, he created a wheel that illustrates twenty-four nature true colors.

        

                                   

There are several different types of color wheel choices available and each has its uses. But for our lessons we will be using the Herbert Ive's method which is based on physics, the true colors in nature, and is the wheel of choice for all fabric, furniture, clothing, yarn and paper companies. The Herbert Ive's primary colors are Cyan (Turquoise), Magenta, and Yellow. If you have ever gone to purchase ink for your printer, you might have noticed that the colors on the box are also listed in the C, M, Y manner.

If you do not own a color wheel, this might be a good time to purchase one, as we will be using the Joen Wolfrom (Show 103: Visualizing Color!) Herbert Ives based wheel, during all of our color lessons. Joen also offers an Ultimate 3-in-1 Color Tool, which we will also be using as a reference.

 

 

 

Pure Hues/Colors

Pure hues/colors are the most vibrant and the head of their color family. The names we generally associate with them include red, green, purple, fuchsia, orange, yellow, aqua blue, cerulean blue, blue-violet, golden yellow, and yellow. Walk through any quilt store and these vibrantly colored fabrics are most likely those that will catch your eye. Pure hues/colors are exciting, powerful and love to be the extrovert, however, if too many are used in a quilt, they can overwhelm the viewer. Things associated with pure color include: tangerines, red geraniums, and grass.

 

       
Tints

When you add white to a hue/color the result is called a tint. The more white that is added, the softer the hue/color becomes. Often the word 'light' is associated with a tint. These hues/colors are considered delicate, springlike, clean, and youthful. Things associated with tints include: green lotus blossoms, Quinoa, and pink anemones.

 

                                       
Shade

When black is added to a hue/color it becomes darker, just as an umbrella shades us from the sun. More earthy, these hues/color are associated with the autumn, nightime or darker wooded areas. Think of things you already know: rust on steel, orchid leaves, or fall leaves.

Below are two examples of what happens when a pure hue/color has white, gray or black added to it.

    
Images by TheQuiltShow.com

Now Let's look at some examples of quilts that fall under each of these categories:

 

Pure Hue/Color

  Dotting Inside the Box by Sandi Snow  Crossing Paths by Diane Melms
   Dotting Inside the Box by Sandi Snow.                                      Crossing Paths by Diane Melms.

  Midsummer Tomato by Diane Perin  Red and White Sampler by Doretta Bradshaw
   Midsummer Tomato by Diane Perin.                                        Red and White Sampler by Doretta Bradshaw.

 

Tint

  Washday with Frieda by Barbara Strobel Spring Rhapsody by Nancy Cook
    Washday with Frieda by Barbara Strobel.                            Spring Rhapsody by Nancy Cook.

  Summer at Ocean Beach: White Sky in July by Sonya Lee Barrington
    Summer at Ocean Beach: White Sky in July by Sonya Lee Barrington (Show 1012). Vintage Log Cabin by Jean Wells (Show 107, Show 1301, and Show 2513)

  Hens and Chicks by Grace Errea
    Hens and Chicks by Grace Errea

 

Shade

   Twirly Balls and Pinwheels by Sue Garman
   Twirly Balls and Pinwheels by Sue Garman (Show 304 and Show 503)

  Rob's Quilt by Kathy Martin  It’s About Time by Janet Steadman
   Rob's Quilt by Kathy Martin.                                                           It’s About Time by Janet Steadman.

  Tuning Fork #22: "Dark Waters" by Heather Pregger
   Tuning Fork #22: "Dark Waters" by Heather Pregger

Tone

  V& A Museum “1797 Sundial Coverlet” by Carolyn Konig Floral Bouquet by Yoko Saito
   V & A Museum “1797 Sundial Coverlet” by Carolyn Konig (Show 1411). Floral Bouquet by Yoko Saito (Show 1505).

  End of the Line? By Joanne Baeth
   End of the Line? By Joanne Baeth

   Silent Night by Maryellen Montague
   Silent Night by Maryellen Montague

 
Work Exercise: Create Your Own Color Scale

Using the example below, draw a set of boxes on a sheet of white cardstock paper. Give each box a pure color name of your choosing. Label the group of boxes as indicated on the far right box. This will be helpful as a reference.

1. Paint the pure color in the center (where you see the name listed). Wait a few minutes to let this dry.
2. Tints - Add a small amount of white paint to your color. Paint this new tint just above the first color. Let the paint dry a bit. Gradually add a bit more white to the first color and continue filling in the appropriate box. Repeat for the remaining two boxes.

3. Shade - Add a small bit of black paint to your color. Paint the new shade just below the first color. Let the paint dry a bit. Gradually add a bit more black to the first color and continue filling in the appropriate lower boxes. Repeat for the remaining two colors.

You can practice this exercise with as many colors as you desire.


   Image by TheQuiltShow.com

Click here for more topics related to The Art of Quilt Design program.

 

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We continue our feature on quilts from the Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA) exhibit, Layered & Stitched: Fifty Years of Innovation, as featured at the Texas Quilt Museum. The exhibit is described as:

Studio Art Quilt Associates presents Layered & Stitched: Fifty Years of Innovation at the Texas Quilt Museum in Galleries I and III. These studio art quilts, dating from 1968 to 2016, represent the extraordinary range of talented artists working in contemporary quilt art. Featuring a balance of abstract and representational styles, Layered & Stitched includes several foreign artists, with a wide geographic distribution of makers in general. The curatorial vision of this exhibition embraces diversity and excellence, including three-dimensional works. Juried by Nancy Bavor, Director of the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles; Martha Sielman, Executive Director of SAQA; and Dr. Sandra Sider, Curator of the Texas Quilt Museum, who says, "Jurying this spectacular exhibition was one of the highlights of my career! It is an amazing show of historic significance."

The exhibit has also been collected in a companion book as well, titled Art Quilts Unfolding: 50 Years of Innovation by Nancy Bavor, Lisa Ellis, Martha Sielman, and edited by Sandra Sider. The book is described as:

Published by Schiffer Books, Art Quilts Unfolding offers full-color images of 400 masterpieces along with engaging interviews and profiles of 58 influential artists, key leaders, important events, and significant collections. Organized by decade, an additional 182 international artists' works are featured.
 
An introduction by Janet Koplos, former senior editor of Art in America, and a conclusion by Ulysses Grant Dietz, emeritus chief curator of the Newark Museum, help us to understand the impact and the future of the art.
 
 
The exhibit will be on display at:
(Due to the current situation around the country, dates for the exhibit have changed.)
Ross Art Museum, Delaware, Ohio: May 14, 2021 - July 2, 2021
San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles: October 10, 2021 - January 9, 2022
 

Please enjoy the eighth quilt from the exhibition by Mary Pal.

Title of Quilt: The Drifter

Quilter's Name: Mary Pal

Photos by Mary Kay Davis

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Alexis Deise and the "Ninth Street Women" Bee were inspired by the work of Louise Nevelson, who was known for her monochromatic sculptures featuring found and discarded objects. (An upcycling pioneer). Each member of the bee made blocks using discarded scraps and leftover blocks and these were used to create the quilt.

Tante Louise by Alexis Deise of the Boston Modern Quilt Guild and others won Second Place, Group & Bee Quilts, sponsored by Modern Quilt Guild, at QuiltCon 2020.

Pieced With: Rebecca Loren, Amy Kidd, and Susan McKinney

Quitled By: Linda Wolyniec

Photos by Mary Kay Davis


Top 10 Reasons to Join the Quilt Show!

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Learn about
Apliquick appliqué tools!

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with Rosa Rojas (free!)

Apliquick Rods

 

Apliquick - 3 Holes Microserrated Scissors

 

Apliquick Ergonomic Tweezers